The 2008 ABA Journal Blawg 100

These are the 100 best Web sites by lawyers, for lawyers, as chosen by the editors of the ABA Journal.

The voting period has ended.

Thank you to all who participated. The final results are listed below.

For a printable list of all 100 blogs, click here. Check out the mini profiles of Ann Althouse, Ernie Svenson and Jurist-Paper Chase. For our list of One-Hit Wonders, click here.





212
votes

Defending People

Criminal defense work and zen serenity are not mutually exclusive in Mark Bennett's opinion. Defending People's tagline is "The tao of criminal-defense trial lawyering." Bennett—who graduated from high school in New Delhi, majored in religious studies in college and practices out of Houston—offers his raw, matter-of-fact commentary and level-headed analysis of cases, politics and criminal justice-related news as it draws his interest.

 

184
votes

Simple Justice

Manhattan criminal defense attorney Scott Greenfield has his finger on the pulse of the blawgosphere. His early morning posts offer biting commentary, often uncovering by breakfast what we’ll be talking about for the rest of the day. Although he announced his retirement in February, by March he was back in business. “Truth be told, I was bored,” he wrote.

 

141
votes

Sentencing Law and Policy

Ohio State law professor Douglas Berman notes congressional hearings, scholarship and general trends related to sentencing, and sometimes handicaps the sentences that can be anticipated by those convicted in high-profile criminal cases. Unlike most criminal law bloggers, he writes with a fairly objective tone.

 

78
votes

Grits for Breakfast

Texas political consultant Scott Henson considers how his state is addressing crime and punishment—its appellate courts, its agencies, its law enforcement, its legislation and its prisons.

 

35
votes

Courthouse Confessions

New York Post photographer Steven Hirsch’s site is more artistic endeavor than legal blog, but we dare you not to love it. The premise: Hirsch photographs defendants leaving the 100 Centre Street courthouse in New York City, interviews them and transcribes their stories.