Blawg 100 Archives

The 2011 ABA Journal Blawg 100

On our 5th birthday, you'll see some familiar faces at the party: bloggers who've been on our list in years past.

But 2011 also brought along a lot of newcomers, and we're delighted that so many RSVP'd our invitation to nominate their favorites. We received more than 1,300 Blawg Amici this year, and that made for a hard time narrowing the field to 100 law blogs.

Click here to peruse the law blogs in alphabetical order. Popular voting ended on Dec. 30. Scroll down and click a category title to see the popular vote totals for each blog by category.

We also invite you to browse our Blawg Directory , now featuring some 3,500 law blogs in dozens of categories and author types. And only a handful of blogs aren't on Twitter these days, so follow this year's picks on our Twitter List, as they post at 140 characters a clip.

News

464
votes

Above the Law

Above the Law

In a Supreme Ambitions post this fall, David Lat summed up the blog he founded in this way: “Above the Law ... covers the legal profession at large, in a sweeping, high/low mix—from the heights of the U.S. Supreme Court to the depths of disgraced and depraved attorneys.” That pretty much nails it. We’ll also note that ATL has added directories of law schools, law firms and recruiters this year, as well as a few new columnists.

Twitter: @atlblog

421
votes

SCOTUSblog

SCOTUSblog

We couldn’t agree more with one fan who held up SCOTUSblog as “extraordinary,” a site that “sets the gold standard to which all blawgs should aspire.” Indeed, SCOTUSblog was on a roll in 2012 as it celebrated its 10-year anniversary, crossed over into pop culture as founder Tom Goldstein made an appearance on The Daily Show, and saw an astounding response to its live blog of the Supreme Court’s health care ruling. The coverage attracted 5 million hits and 1 million simultaneous users, including President Barack Obama.

Twitter: @scotusblog

165
votes

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The BLT: The Blog of Legal Times

This blog is indispensable to us for its exhaustive District of Columbia coverage: from happenings at the U.S. Supreme Court (and news about individual justices) to rulings from the District of Columbia Circuit to BigLaw churn in the Beltway.

Twitter: @Legal_Times

104
votes

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The Am Law Daily

With a team of reporters on tap and supported by a network of legal publications, Am Law Daily covers the happenings at the country’s largest law firms, from firm finances and business models to the latest lateral moves and partner defections.

Twitter: @AmLawDaily

92
votes

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THR, Esq.

If you like your celebrity news with a legal twist, the Hollywood Reporter's Hollywood, Esq., is for you. Intellectual property battles, contract disputes, divorce cases—if it happens in the entertainment industry, these bloggers are on it. These are not just puff pieces; the blog offers some very decent legal analysis, raising itself above the pack of your average celebrity news blogs.

Twitter: @thresq

84
votes

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The Not-So Private Parts (defunct)

HALL OF FAME With this year's revelations about NSA surveillance, Kashmir Hill's privacy blog on Forbes.com should find itself with even more readers. While many posts are labeled "Headline Grab" and are more akin to tweets, Hill also composes substantive posts about topics such as how long-forgotten Facebook posts might come back to haunt you and why your baby monitor's webcam should be password-protected.

Twitter: @kashhill

70
votes

Law Blog

Law Blog

This year, many of our cherished American Lawyer Media blogs (The Careerist, The Blog of Legal Times, The Am Law Daily) went behind paywalls. But late in 2013, the Wall Street Journal's Law Blog came out from behind its paywall, and we wanted to make sure you knew. Its multiple updates every weekday hit most of the highlights of the day's legal news, and we consider it essential reading.

Twitter: @WSJLawBlog

Trial Practice

197
votes

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The Velvet Hammer

Seasoned litigator Karen Koehler's blog combines tips gleaned from her career as a trial attorney and glimpses from her daily interactions—all written like trial transcripts. We especially appreciate her legal writing advice, focusing on precision and the elision of unnecessary verbiage.

Twitter: @k3VelvetHammer

101
votes

How Appealing

How Appealing

As Nicholas Wagoner from Circuit Splits points out, Howard Bashman not only continues to churn out links on this appellate news-watch blog but also points readers to high-quality reporting on the subject. Bashman, practicing out of Willow Grove, Pa., also sends readers directly to federal and state court opinions so they can brush up on the latest appellate news from original sources.

Twitter: @howappealing

74
votes

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The Jury Room

The bloggers of Keene Trial Consulting offer an interesting overview of many psychological and sociological elements to consider when crafting an argument to appeal to specific juror demographics. We especially appreciate how they explicitly tailor their advice to address the concerns of both plaintiffs attorneys and defense attorneys.

Twitter: @keenetrial

55
votes

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Persuasive Litigator

There's plenty of advice out there for trial attorneys, but what makes the Persuasive Litigator stand out is its use of data and statistical studies on jury behavior. Ken Broda-Bahm writes in a concise and readable style, and his posts are interesting not only for litigators, but also for anyone with an interest in jury psychology.

Twitter: @LitigationTips

49
votes

From the Sidebar

From the Sidebar

Cozen O’Connor partner Hayes Hunt and a formidable in-firm backbench give concrete criminal defense trial practice advice, share personal anecdotes from the courtroom and offer commentary on criminal cases in the news.

Twitter: @HayesHunt

47
votes

The Appellate Record

The Appellate Record

Houston appellate lawyer Kendall Gray doesn’t persuade juries about facts; he persuades judges about the law. And that’s greatly a written exercise. Gray’s breezy posts focus largely on grammar, writing, editing and even typography. There are also occasional asides about the members of the Supreme Court of Texas and the antics of trial lawyers.

Twitter: @AppellateRecord

LPM

150
votes

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Small Firm Innovation

Solos and small-firm practitioners—many of whom are established bloggers—write from personal experience at this group blog where posts are loosely centered on a monthly theme. The lawyers share specific problems they've encountered (and how they solved them) as well as pet peeves, favorite books and tech tips. Some themes from this year have delved into inspiring books, "outsourcing the small stuff" and the grating pop jargon of law practice management.

Twitter: @sfinnovation

138
votes

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The Careerist

HALL OF FAME American Lawyer reporter Vivia Chen writes graceful prose without dancing around the issues near and dear to her readers, who want to succeed in law on their own terms. Some choice questions from her posts this year: Should men be gagged, tied up and forced to take paternity leave? Do you ever feel like wringing the necks of underlings who seem incapable of following your directives? Keep telling us how you really feel, Vivia, and we'll keep reading.

Twitter: @lawcareerist

86
votes

Legal Practice Pro

Legal Practice Pro

Consumer bankruptcy lawyer Jay Fleischman is also a legal marketing consultant who writes on the business of law. Written primarily for solos and small firms, his posts discuss client billing, law practice management, professional development, legal technology, virtual law firms and, of course, marketing and social media.

Twitter: @JayFleischman

64
votes

MyShingle.com

My Shingle

After 10 years of blogging, D.C. lawyer Carolyn Elefant is still a voice for solos in a profession that she feels—as far as costs and ethical obligations—favors too much those practicing at large firms. Elefant isn’t really one to blog on innovative law practice management solutions she reads about elsewhere; it’s usually her own ideas and opinions she shares with readers day after day.

Twitter: @carolynelefant

63
votes

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Lawyerist

HALL OF FAME If you like your law-practice-management advice tinged with humor and real talk, Lawyerist may be the blog for you. Though its format has changed a good deal since we first added it to the Blawg 100 in 2009, it's maintained its place on our list through its thoughtful-yet-humorous takes on a wide range of LPM topics, from marketing to technology to rainmaking.

Twitter: @lawyerist

62
votes

Adam Smith, Esq.

Adam Smith, Esq.

HALL OF FAME Law firm consultant Bruce MacEwen's "synthesis of economics and the law is especially interesting in the work I do and because both topics, separately and combined, make for great reading post-2008. Moreover, MacEwen is a careful writer, and his articles reflect that." —Mark Reber, senior marketing manager at Bullivant Houser Bailey in Portland, Oregon

Twitter: @BruceMacEwen

51
votes

Virtual Law Practice

Virtual Law Practice

Solo practitioner Stephanie Kimbro has operated a virtual law firm out of Wilmington, N.C., for five years. She uses her experience to write about the ethics, technology and practical aspects involved in virtual lawyering. Her Twitter stream is a great place to look for any stories written about virtual law practice.

Twitter: @StephKimbro

44
votes

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Law21

The 21st century has been tough on traditional legal business models, and it's widely felt that law firms need to innovate or die. But what, exactly, do these lawyers have to do? And why aren't they doing it? Canadian management consultant Jordan Furlong tackles these questions at his blog and in a new e-book: Evolutionary Road: A Strategic Guide to Your Law Firm's Future. Some interesting posts from this year look at how law firms' values and culture contribute to their woes.

Twitter: @jordan_law21

27
votes

Associate's Mind.

Associate's Mind

A mixture of Zen Buddhism and law practice management, Keith Lee’s blog posits that an experienced lawyer’s mind is fixed, while a young associate’s mind is open to more possibilities. Fellow associate Peter Smith of the Apex Law Group in Seattle says, "That theme, viewing challenges of legal practice from a beginner’s mind, has helped me grow in my own practice—it reminds me to approach problems with the vigor of a beginner.”

Twitter: @associatesmind

25
votes

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Legal Profession Blog

The posts here often have us wondering, “What were they thinking?” If a lawyer strays from ethical boundaries, the professors who blog here are quick to pick up on the trail of any discipline with to-the-point, snark-free dispatches.

25
votes

CEB Blog

CEB Blog: Your Partner in Practice

Offering valuable tips for practitioners on legal writing, litigation strategies and a broad range of legal topics, this blog from Continuing Education of the Bar (CEB), which is affiliated with the State Bar of California and the University of California, is both informative and on point. “I learn something new every time I read it,” writes solo Mary Rupp of Oakland. “It is well-written and always topical, with useful citations and a fresh look at the legal aspects of current events.”

Twitter: @CEB_CA

18
votes

At the Intersection

At the Intersection

Pam Woldow of Philadelphia, general counsel of global legal consulting firm Edge International, taps her background as a BigLaw litigator as she explores topics of legal project management in transactional practices.

Twitter: @pwoldow

16
votes

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The Wired GC

John Wallbillich, founder of Lexvista LLC in Birmingham, Mich., and a former energy company general counsel, publishes our only blog nominee focusing exclusively on in-house counsel. Written with an eye to the future of legal billing, BigLaw trends and legal technology, Wired GC is thoughtful, thorough and a great look at what the corporate law hivemind is thinking.

Twitter: @wiredgc

Niche

1069
votes

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Legal As She Is Spoke

This blog is a product of the Program in Law and Journalism at New York Law School, and reports on the state of legal journalism. "It's entertaining and gives quick takes on how the news media get the legal stories wrong. Always interesting, always remarkable. Especially because it's done by students." —Fred Stone, Millennium Partners, New York City

Twitter: @LASIS_Blog

812
votes

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China Law Blog

HALL OF FAME This is a highly specific niche blog that nonetheless deserves its spot in the top 100 because of how utterly indispensable it is for its demographic. If you practice law in or around China or if you do any business with Chinese companies, you probably already have this bookmarked. Heck, if you're even visiting China, give it a read because the bloggers provide excellent practical advice on not getting kidnapped. (We admit being fascinated by the anti-kidnapping advice.)

Twitter: @chinalawblog

131
votes

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Wills, Trusts & Estates Prof Blog

Death and taxes are certainties for which we may plan. But quite a few of life's uncertainties can be faced with equanimity as well, if we just make some prudent preparations, Texas Tech law professor Gerry W. Beyer tells us. His blog provides useful advice on doing so, along with book and article summaries and thoughtful news analysis. Entries are concise and accessible, even to those who are unversed in estate law topics.

Twitter: @Gerry_Beyer

109
votes

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Taxgirl

HALL OF FAME Philadelphia lawyer Kelly Phillips Erb finds the tax angles of the day's major stories, sometimes consulting experts and sometimes sharing her own opinions on U.S. tax policy. Celebrities' tax woes often make appearances. This year, she also did a series of "back to school" posts that answered tax questions tied to the beginning of the academic year: Are tutoring services deductible? How do you document school-supply donations for tax purposes? Can you deduct expenses related to kids' sports?

Twitter: @taxgirl

96
votes

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Inside the Law School Scam

“Its daily posts on legal employment, law school costs and legal academics are consistently forceful, fresh and sharply written,” wrote the Volokh Conspiracy’s Orin Kerr, a law professor at George Washington University. “Unsurprisingly, the blog has had a major influence on perceptions of law schools among the entering student body of 1Ls. You can agree or disagree with its message, of course. But it’s an excellent blog,” Kerr says. Since last year, Ohio State law prof Deborah Jones Merritt has joined the University of Colorado’s Paul Campos as a contributor, and Campos has also written an e-book: Don’t Go to Law School (Unless).

91
votes

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TaxProf Blog

HALL OF FAME Paul Caron, a professor at Pepperdine University School of Law, covers tax reform in the news and scholarship related to U.S. tax law, and he notes celebrity tax disasters. But we like TaxProf at least as much for Caron's exhaustive coverage of news and debates covering legal education. He became the sole owner of the Law Professor Blogs Network and a makeover of that group of blogs soon followed.

Twitter: @SoCalTaxProf

60
votes

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PrawfsBlawg

Day in and day out, law professors post conversational entries that are ahead of the curve. Posts take note of interesting law review articles, describe dilemmas that law professors encounter in the course of their jobs, and make intelligent and timely observations on other subjects of interest to them.

Twitter: @PrawfsBlawg

53
votes

Religion Clause

Religion Clause

HALL OF FAME "Religion Clause is an invaluable resource for anyone interested in religion in the law. It handles controversial issues in an extraordinarily evenhanded and useful manner. As a litigator working in this area of the law, I read it every morning to keep abreast of new cases and scholarship." —Charles Gokey, the Steven Gey fellow at Americans United for Separation of Church and State in Washington, D.C.

Twitter: @religionclause

45
votes

Food and Agriculture Law Blog

Food and Agriculture Law Blog

Straddling the divide between the legal and agricultural worlds is Cari Rincker, who Farm and Dairy editor Susan Crowell says “offers great insight into today’s issues and challenges from both perspectives.”

Twitter: @rinckerlaw

45
votes

Equine Law Blog

Equine Law Blog

This blog by Alison Rowe of the law firm of Kelly Hart & Hallman in Fort Worth, Texas, is “informative and up to date in a relatively undeveloped area of law,” says Holden Hoggatt of Jennings, La. He says posts aid practitioners, himself included, who are focused on the practice of equine law.

Twitter: @alisonmrowe

43
votes

Legal Planet

Legal Planet

Environmental and law professors from University of California campuses in Berkeley, Los Angeles and Davis have the planet (and the EPA) covered with timely, thoughtful posts noting and analyzing developments in the ever complex and increasingly front-page arena of environmental law—from climate change and air quality to conservation and even discussion of environmental law in religious and children’s literature.

36
votes

Election Law Blog

Election Law Blog

"The most comprehensive coverage of issues related to election law, including campaign finance and disclosure laws and litigation; voting rights; tax laws governing nonprofit electoral activity; and election administration. Indispensable, with top-flight contributors and readers. Don't miss the associated Listserv, where the smartest academics and practitioners in the country duke it out on these issues." —John Pomeranz of Harmon, Curran, Spielberg & Eisenberg in Washington, D.C.

Twitter: @rickhasen

36
votes

Richard Zorza's Access to Justice Blog

Richard Zorza's Access to Justice Blog

While his blog is new (turning 1 this month), D.C. lawyer Richard Zorza is an access-to-justice veteran, which Allison McDermott of Pro Bono Net says makes his blog a “must-read.” She writes that Zorza’s “breadth of knowledge and contacts comes across in each post, and he is not shy about strongly recommending changes to the status quo, while always keeping his eye (and voice) on those who cannot afford justice in our country.”

Twitter: @rzorza

25
votes

Pink Tape

Pink Tape

Passionate, cleverly written and sometimes painfully funny, Pink Tape is often a meld of the personal and professional life of opinionated Bristol family law barrister Lucy Reed, who this year published a pro se guide called Family Courts Without a Lawyer. The book is her response to cutbacks in legal aid in the U.K., also a frequent topic of blog posts.

Twitter: @Familoo

For Fun

188
votes

Lowering the Bar

Lowering the Bar

HALL OF FAME Lowering the Bar's Kevin Underhill has been making us laugh—and earning a slot in the Blawg 100—since 2010 with his legal musings. Also, check out a book Underhill published this year that stemmed from some of his writing on the blog: The Emergency Sasquatch Ordinance: and Other Real Laws that Human Beings Actually Dreamed Up, Enacted, and Have Sometimes Enforced.

Twitter: @loweringthebar

127
votes

that's what she said

"that's what she said"

The lawyers at Ford & Harrison take a closer look at the employees of Dunder Mifflin on NBC’s The Office—more specifically, at the egregious violations of labor and employment law featured in every episode.

Twitter: @HRHero

111
votes

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Corporette

While this blog's most popular posts help female readers steer clear of the fashion police, former Wall Street lawyer Kat Griffin also takes questions from young lawyers and others about how to avoid career pitfalls. Posts written with empathy cover business etiquette, troubles with co-workers, interviewing, networking and more.

Twitter: @corporette

105
votes

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The Prime-Time Crime Review

Lead actor Christopher Meloni may have left the show, but don’t think that Allison Leotta is giving up on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Relying on her background as a Washington, D.C., sex crimes prosecutor, Leotta analyzes each episode for its adherence to real legal procedures. The blog was previously called the Prime-Time Crime Review, but changed its name this year. Leotta is the author of two legal thrillers, Law of Attraction and Discretion, and also blogs about tips for other crime writers.

Twitter: @AllisonLeotta

79
votes

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Law and the Multiverse

Using the world of superheroes to explore legal theory is this blog's raison d'être. Although the concept may seem gimmicky, the analysis is absorbing. If presented with sentient aliens, clones and mutants, how would our justice system apply its current laws? Authors James Daily and Ryan Davidson look at comic book, movie and TV show scenarios and then play out the potential real-world legal consequences.

Twitter: @LawATMultiverse

57
votes

The Namby Pamby, Attorney-at-Law

The Namby Pamby

The Namby Pamby, a civil litigator in Chicago, still suffers fools gladly and updates us on “facepalm moments” prompted by his clients, his colleagues and his own lapses. We’re still laughing, and we’re interested in his evolving perspective: Namby has been blogging since his law student days, but his blog (not sure about the new layout, BTW) notes he’s soon to be married, and he must be 30 by now.

Twitter: @thenambypamby

49
votes

Constitutional Daily

Constitutional Daily

Constitutional Daily is a young blog but an influential one. Its news summaries and columns are the product of a bitterly funny, mostly anonymous cadre of authors. The Namby Pamby, Attorney-at-Law, whose blog also makes our top 100, partners with editor-in-chief BL1Y to produce the podcast Blind Drunk Justice.

Twitter: @Con_Daily

26
votes

Law Law Land

Law Law Land

While its amici were divided over whether its jokes are witty or awful, we come down on the side of "awesomely bad." Run by LA's Greenberg Glusker, it's consistently one of the most entertaining entertainment law blogs out there. Full of pop-culture references, its posts are lighthearted but informative.

Twitter: @lawlawlandblog

Opinion

425
votes

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Jonathan Turley

HALL OF FAME George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley draws on his own experience in high-profile litigation as he analyzes breaking news items that raise legal questions. His posts, and those of his guests, show a particular interest in the First Amendment, rights of consumers, the rights of criminal defendants and the patently bizarre.

Twitter: @JonathanTurley

315
votes

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The Volokh Conspiracy

The layout, lineup of writers and libertarian leanings have stayed the same, as well as the blog’s focus on constitutional law issues in the news (although there is a little more about legal education in the past year). Which is to say, it’s still a great blog, and there’s no other one with contributors so engaged with each other that they’ll spontaneously post dueling updates on a topic within the same day—or maybe within the same hour.

Twitter: @VolokhC

108
votes

Popehat

Popehat

Sometimes inspiring, sometimes infuriating and always irreverent, Popehat is one of the most stalwart blogs out there. A tireless champion of freedom of speech and civil liberties, this group blog delights in tweaking the noses of those it considers copyright trolls. Though its authors have always argued that Popehat is not strictly a law blog, so much of its content centers around legal matters that it easily meets our criteria.

Twitter: @popehat

78
votes

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The Legal Satyricon

Late last year, Marc Randazza and his Las Vegas-based law group took on so-called copyright troll Righthaven and won. And Randazza continues to blog on First Amendment, copyright and fair use cases, never mincing words if he thinks the basis of a party’s accusation or defense is ridiculous.

Twitter: @marcorandazza

56
votes

Althouse

Althouse

In nearly eight years of blogging, Ann Althouse doesn’t miss a chance to offer her conservative take on the latest political dustup. Or become part of a dustup, as she did this year in a well-publicized (and videotaped) altercation with a pro-labor demonstrator in Madison, Wis., where she lives. Readers less interested in her commentary on pop culture or politics can “make Althouse an all-law blog” in her main nav bar.

Twitter: @annalthouse

IP Law

845
votes

Patently-O

Patently-O

We’ve consistently heard from readers like Chris Holly who check Patently-O daily to keep up on developments (and jobs) in patent law. “I’m a patent prosecutor and reading the blog every day keeps me up to speed with what is going on in the patent world,” wrote Holly, an associate with Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell and Berkowitz in D.C. Co-authors Dennis Crouch of the University of Missouri School of Law and Jason Rantanen of the University of Iowa also have guest posts by other patent practitioners “that are insightful,” Holly wrote. We were excited to see a “Patent Ethics” corner started by Mercer University law prof David Hricik, but sorry to see it go on hiatus during his clerkship.

Twitter: @patentlyo

702
votes

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IPWatchdog

HALL OF FAME "Gene Quinn is fearless. He is not hesitant to point out what he perceives to be injustices spawned by particular court decisions or other developments. Furthermore, when reporting on statistics concerning patents, he drills down to discuss the reasons why the numbers read as they do, or why there may be more to the statistics than meets the eye. IPWatchdog also hosts excellent guest posts on patent law developments." —Mike Cicero, Atlanta

Twitter: @IPWatchdog

50
votes

Copyhype

Copyhype

“Terrence Hart’s Copyhype has rapidly established itself as one of the best copyright blogs on the Web,” writes Ben Sheffner, author of the Copyrights & Campaigns blog, which is on hiatus. The site’s clean and spare design echoes the fine print of a contract, and this is fine print you’d actually enjoy reading. Its column Friday’s Endnotes links and summarizes the week’s most relevant copyright news.

Twitter: @terrencehart

44
votes

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internetcases

Evan Brown is a prolific Twitterer, and his blog posts of breaking Internet law news have informed our own coverage of news events. His summaries of cases nationwide offer a window into this emerging field.

Twitter: @internetcases

37
votes

Bow Tie Law's Blog

Bow Tie Law's Blog

We value Joshua Gilliland’s Bow Tie Law blog—an exhaustive look at e-discovery issues—for being on the cutting edge of evidentiary news, and for explaining the nuts and bolts in a clear and concise manner. This attorney from Santa Clara, Calif., is also quite the snazzy dresser.

Twitter: @bowtielaw

33
votes

Blog Law Blog

Blog Law Blog

“Professor Eric Johnson draws on his media law background to monitor and comment on the emerging law of blogs. This is a blog on the rise,” says fellow Blawg 100 nominee Eric Goldman, author of Technology & Marketing Law Blog.

Twitter: @tweetlawtweets

Labor & Employment

170
votes

Work Matters

Work Matters

A reader favorite, Dallas lawyer Michael P. Maslanka consistently produces thoughtful, insightful pieces breaking down recent cases and discussing employment law issues in the news for a blog hosted by Texas Lawyer.

Twitter: @worklawyer

131
votes

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Screw You Guys, I'm Going Home

While plenty of employment-law blogs are available to advise business owners, pickings are much more slim for employees. Fortunately, the blog Screw You Guys, I'm Going Home is available to anyone facing an issue with an employer. Offering plainspoken wisdom about just what an employee's rights may be, Donna Ballman's blog can help workers learn how to avoid being fired—or how to safely quit their jobs.

Twitter: @EmployeeAtty

117
votes

FMLA Insights

FMLA Insights

"I work on consulting teams that help large clients with their FMLA and disability administration," writes Liz Miller, a health and benefits analyst at Mercer in Washington, D.C. She says Chicago lawyer Jeff Nowak's "consistent updates not only make me look smart on the job; they are also entertaining and fascinating. Reading his posts feels like a form of procrastination because of the instant gratification factor, but they actually help me in my career. If that's not a win-win, I don't know what is."

Twitter: @jeffreysnowak

96
votes

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The Delaware Employment Law Blog

HALL OF FAME How technology and social media affect modern employers and employment law has been a particular focus of Molly DiBianca, although she ably covers other topics as well. The blog is full of thoughtful and well-reasoned advice to employers and their attorneys; while the laws cited may be specific to Delaware, the broader principles are applicable across the country.

Twitter: @MollyDiBi

94
votes

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Employment & Labor Insider

Winston-Salem, North Carolina, litigator Robin Shea "writes the best employment law blog you're not reading. She may only publish once a week, but oh, those posts! They are witty, insightful and, most of all, easy to understand and relate to. It's a pleasure reading someone who writes as well as she does." —Daniel Schwartz, Connecticut Employment Law Blog

Twitter: @RobinEShea

75
votes

Arizoneout

Arizoneout

This new blog by Ford & Harrison’s Dinita James—a onetime newspaper reporter—inspired Tony Kessler of employment law publishing house M. Lee Smith Publishers to fire up this brief: “Who would have ever thought that a blawg about medical marijuana in the workplace would take off and reach such dizzying heights? The blawg is indeed creating quite a buzz among Arizona employers and employment law attorneys. Each new installment creates a stash of valuable information that readers can put in their pipe and smoke.”

Twitter: @Arizoneout

63
votes

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The Employer Handbook

As you may have gleaned from the name, this blog looks at labor and employment issues from the perspective of business owners. Topics covered range from accommodating employees' service animals to figuring out how to deal with Facebook posts insulting the boss. Eric B. Meyer, who is an attorney in Philadelphia, is most familiar with Pennsylvania and New Jersey laws. But even employers in other states can find useful tips and tricks.

Twitter: @Eric_B_Meyer

27
votes

Connecticut Employment Law Blog

Connecticut Employment Law Blog

HALL OF FAME Why are we featuring an employment law blog for Connecticut and not a state with a higher population? Because Hartford-based blogger (and '09 Legal Rebel) Daniel Schwartz consistently impresses us with concise and incisive analysis of the latest cases and issues to arise in employment law, although occasionally venturing into more lighthearted territory. ("Ten of the Best Workplace Songs for Labor Day," for example.)

Twitter: @danielschwartz

25
votes

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Ohio Employer's Law Blog

Cleveland lawyer Jon Hyman "always provides good advice and discusses relevant issues. And despite being a management-side attorney, he is an advocate for workers' rights as well." —Casey Sipe, Scaringi & Scaringi in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Twitter: @jonhyman

Criminal Justice

158
votes

Koehler Law

Koehler Law

Jamison Koehler writes that he decided to live in Baltimore "not despite The Wire but because of it." As a criminal defense attorney and former public defender, he uses his blog to argue against the sort of corruption and injustice seen in that TV show, and to advocate for the rights of criminal defendants.

Twitter: @jamisonkoehler

65
votes

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The Federal Criminal Appeals Blog

D.C. lawyer Matt Kaiser's blog is devoted to covering criminal defense wins in federal appellate courts. "The posts are well-written and amusing, and it's always useful for future briefs for examples of defense wins," writes Sarah Howard, a partner at Warner Norcross & Judd in Grand Rapids, Mich. The blog "makes for easy circuit-to-circuit comparisons as well," writes Winter Park, Fla., appellate lawyer Michael Brownlee.

Twitter: @mattkaiser

59
votes

Simple Justice

Simple Justice

Manhattan criminal defense attorney Scott Greenfield has his finger on the pulse of the blawgosphere. His early morning posts offer biting commentary, often uncovering by breakfast what we’ll be talking about for the rest of the day. Although he announced his retirement in February, by March he was back in business. “Truth be told, I was bored,” he wrote.

Twitter: @scottgreenfield

44
votes

Sentencing Law and Policy

Sentencing Law and Policy

Ohio State law professor Douglas Berman notes congressional hearings, scholarship and general trends related to sentencing, and sometimes handicaps the sentences that can be anticipated by those convicted in high-profile criminal cases. Unlike most criminal law bloggers, he writes with a fairly objective tone.

Twitter: @SLandP

35
votes

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D.A. Confidential

“Mark Pryor of D.A. Confidential is like the Jerry Seinfeld or Jay Leno of the criminal law blogosphere: He can be funny, original, interesting and entertaining without using obscenity or going for the jugular,” wrote Koehler Law blogger Jamison Koehler. “And, as a former journalist, he knows how to write. It is also helpful to get the perspective of a prosecutor, even if his position constrains him a bit in what he is able to write about.” Pryor is also a novelist: His mystery, The Bookseller, just came out.

Twitter: @DAConfidential

33
votes

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Defending People

HALL OF FAME Houston criminal defense attorney Mark Bennett has been at the legal blogging game for more than 10 years. In his posts, he sides against creating new laws and policies that might protect some but chip away at the First Amendment for all; calls out questionable ethical moves by fellow lawyers and judges in Texas; and shares random tidbits about little things he does to boost his advocacy—like taking improv classes and filing pleadings on quality paper stock.

Twitter: @MarkWBennett

30
votes

Not Guilty No Way

Not Guilty No Way

As Associate’s Mind blogger Keith Lee puts it, Takoma Park, Md., solo Mirriam Seddiq “has no filter. Sure, that might mean her blog might occasionally be NSFW for language, but it’s worth it to read her honest and frank opinions of criminal law and running a small law practice. She might not be the most frequent updater of her blawg, but I read every time she makes an update.”

Twitter: @mirriam71

26
votes

The Criminal Lawyer

The Criminal Lawyer

New York City solo Nathaniel Burney writes analytical and philosophical posts about criminal justice writ large: misconceptions about the rate of violent crime, how to fix the jury system, “overcriminalization” and the high rate of incarceration in the U.S. Though one popular post discussed why someone should or shouldn’t go to law school.

Twitter: @NathanBurney

17
votes

Crime and Consequences

Crime & Consequences

The writers of Crime & Consequences are unapologetic advocates for prosecutors and victims and provide an important perspective on the criminal justice system. The blog, sponsored by the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation, contains blurbs about sentencing news, discussions about the death penalty (they're in favor of it), and information on how court decisions regarding defendants' rights will affect prosecutors and law enforcement.

16
votes

Tempe Criminal Defense

Tempe Criminal Defense

Blogger Matt Brown has a front-row seat at the counsel table for the war on drugs. He writes affectingly about his experiences defending clients on criminal drug and DUI charges, along with a secondary focus on the ethics and effectiveness of legal marketing.

Twitter: @mattbrownaz

Business Law

161
votes

TheRacetotheBottom.org

TheRacetotheBottom.org

Law student contributors summarize recent securities opinions while University of Denver law professor J. Robert Brown writes posts with more analysis about shareholder actions, corporate governance and self-regulatory organizations. Brown will also sometimes detour with a post about law schools or legal scholarship.

Twitter: @RTTBCorpGov

121
votes

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Truth on the Market

This blog’s “academic commentary” on economics, antitrust law and corporate governance is never stuffy. These profs make astute observations and find concrete examples to make their points—and very often, they think the point is that there should be less government regulation all around.

113
votes

Professor Bainbridge

ProfessorBainbridge.com

“Professor Bainbridge is often cited by the Delaware courts in their opinions due to their recognition of his expertise in corporate law. In addition to citations to his books and articles, the court also has cited to his blog posts. [UCLA prof Stephen Bainbridge’s] blog is required reading for those who want the most current insights on corporate law developments from one of the foremost corporate law scholars in the country. His perceptive posts on culture and current events are also enjoyable.” —Francis Pileggi, Delaware Corporate & Commercial Litigation Blog

Twitter: @ProfBainbridge

45
votes

thecorporatecounsel.net

TheCorporateCounsel.net Blog

Broc Romanek’s posts—which appear every weekday, usually before you’ve had your coffee—provide exhaustive coverage of corporate governance topics, the Security and Exchange Commission’s latest moves, and reactions of both companies and shareholders.

Twitter: @brocromanek

39
votes

Delaware Corporate and Commercial Litigation Blog

Delaware Corporate and Commercial Litigation Blog

Because of its perceived friendliness to corporations, the Delaware Court of Chancery is where much corporate litigation goes down, and Wilmington-based attorney Francis Pileggi is a dedicated reporter of its findings. His excellent case summaries and explanations of Delaware law make this one to follow.

Twitter: @fpileggi

34
votes

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The D & O Diary

Greg Myers, who works for risk management broker Beecher Carlson in New York City, says he checks the D&O Diary "every day for relevant news in the executive liability insurance world." Beachwood, Ohio, lawyer Kevin LaCroix's blog notes critical court rulings and litigation highlighting issues that could lead to directors and officers insurance liability exposures.

Twitter: @kevinlacroix

Torts

418
votes

Abnormal Use

Abnormal Use

HALL OF FAME Warning labels on products generally result from someone, somewhere trying something boneheaded, whether it be the consumer or the company itself. At Abnormal Use, breathtaking examples of the tort cases that result from such failures of judgment are cataloged and analyzed. If you're a comic book fan, you'll also enjoy the classic covers used to illustrate the Friday Links posts.

Twitter: @gwblawfirm

340
votes

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Marler Blog

You may never look at a produce aisle the same way again once you’ve read Seattle lawyer Bill Marler’s exhaustive coverage of food safety violations. Marler tracks food poisoning cases with a single-minded fervor, offering a valuable resource to trial attorneys, food producers and anyone sitting down to dinner.

Twitter: @bmarler

120
votes

Overlawyered

Overlawyered

HALL OF FAME Whether or not you're sympathetic to tort reform and the idea that the government overregulates, Overlawyered is a little hair-raising and eye-opening. Its stated mission is to bring to light abuses of the legal system that raise costs and inhibit justice. Acquired this year by the Cato Institute, the blog is the project of Walter Olson, a senior Cato fellow. Having celebrated its 15th anniversary in July, Overlawyered says it may be the oldest legal blog: "At least, no one seems to be able to name one that's older." (Editor's note: After this issue went to press, Robert Ambrogi's Lawsites reported that Olson was not the first blogger: It was Greg Siskind.)

Twitter: @overlawyered

109
votes

Jackson on Consumer Class Actions and Mass Torts

Jackson on Consumer Class Actions and Mass Torts

J. Russell Jackson returns for his second year as a Blawg 100 honoree. Writing from a defense attorney’s point of view, the partner at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom in New York City examines recent court decisions and the latest class action news nationwide with irreverent but substantive posts.

63
votes

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New York Personal Injury Law Blog

Eric Turkewitz’s blog remains a great source for news and commentary from a plaintiffs-side tort lawyer. He may not be blogging as often as in years past, but when he does, it’s worth reading. Despite the name, it’s not all personal injury law; he talks about topics as diverse as politics, long-distance running, legal outsourcing and online extortion.

Twitter: @Turkewitz

29
votes

Drug and Device Law

Drug and Device Law

"The Drug and Device Law blog is the most timely, comprehensive blog I have found on prescription drug and medical device litigation. For recurring issues, the blog updates its scorecards and cheat sheets. For other issues, it offers in-depth summaries with thoughtful analysis. The quality of writing is excellent. As a result, despite its defense slant, the blog has garnered a diverse readership." —James M. Sullivan, Hollingsworth, Washington, D.C.

Twitter: @ddlaw

Legal Technology

216
votes

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iPhone J.D.

HALL OF FAME "Man is only as good as the tool he uses. Mobile computing has fundamentally changed the way lawyers practice law. Jeff Richardson writes about those tools and tells us how they can be used to make us better lawyers. His reviews of apps and accessories explain critical features and limitations in the context of how a lawyer would use those professionally and in personal life beyond work." —Ron Schultz, senior counsel at ConocoPhillips in Houston

Twitter: @iphonejd

156
votes

slaw

Slaw

“Slaw is to law what Slate is to popular culture,” law blogger Robert Ambrogi writes. “It is an online magazine with a diverse array of writers and perspectives covering a wide array of legal topics. It is always interesting, always smart and always insightful. It represents the best of what a legal blog—strike that—any blog can aspire to be.”

Twitter: @slaw_dot_ca

148
votes

3 Geeks and a Law Blog

3 Geeks and a Law Blog

HALL OF FAME While some of our other "geeky" blogs focus on analyzing pop culture in terms of the law, 3 Geeks and a Law Blog devotes itself to actual technology and how it affects one's law practice. Visit it for tips on information management, discussions of new legal tech and analysis about the future of legal services.

Twitter: @glambert

63
votes

Above and Beyond KM

Above and Beyond KM

Blogger V. Mary Abraham is a lawyer focused on knowledge management at Debevoise & Plimpton’s New York City office. Most posts focus not on incremental news developments in her discipline, but rather its “nontech challenges” and big-picture concerns: strategy, productivity, and encouraging strong-willed attorneys to share information systematically.

Twitter: @VMaryAbraham

62
votes

Lawsites

Robert Ambrogi's LawSites

No time to evaluate all the latest platforms geared toward practitioners? No worries. Bob Ambrogi has it covered at LawSites, where he test-drives the latest releases—from new law- and law practice-related apps to new e-tools for legal research, billing and document management. Reviews cover ease of use, usefulness, functionality and cost. But his blog isn’t only about technology. Ambrogi of Rockport, Mass., cross-posted his popular Lawyer2Lawyer podcast on the blog and keeps his readers up on news about ethical implications for lawyers’ use of technology. (Editors' note: The Oct. 31 Lawyer2Lawyer podcast was the final one.)

Twitter: @bobambrogi

44
votes

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Technology & Marketing Law Blog

One could be forgiven for assuming that this blog, founded by Eric Goldman, is a collection of law practice management tips. Instead, it's an intelligent discussion of broadly ranging areas of the law, including privacy, e-commerce, Internet security, intellectual property and advertising.

Twitter: @ericgoldman

41
votes

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Real Lawyers Have Blogs

HALL OF FAME LexBlog founder Kevin O'Keefe of Seattle blogs for a tech-savvy lawyer audience about how to make the most of their legal blogs and presence on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. But don't misunderstand—blogging isn't all about marketing to O'Keefe. "Search results may not be the be-all and end-all for good law blogs," he writes. He thinks it's great how blogs have democratized publishing for lawyers who can now avoid gatekeepers for law reviews and trade industry publications.

Twitter: @KevinOkeefe

40
votes

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FutureLawyer

Are you an Android power user? Then this St. Petersburg, Fla., solo’s blog is for you. Rick Georges puts up one or two brief but substantive posts a day, alternating between content related to Droid apps and other software, and op-eds on law practice issues.

Twitter: @rickgeorges

37
votes

Advocate's Studio

Advocate's Studio

Canton, Mass., solo Martha Sperry’s posts keep a tight focus on the latest updates in gadgets (she’s an iPad user), apps and social networks. Her posts point out the best apps to use (and simple tips on how to use them) to conduct research, organize documents and live your life—all while protecting your privacy.

Twitter: @advocatesstudio

36
votes

Ride the Lightning

Ride the Lightning

With increased law firm reports of cyber-security breaches, it's clear to us that not enough people have been reading Sharon D. Nelson's blog. An expert in digital forensics and information security, Nelson has plenty to say about how to keep your firm safe and your client info encrypted.

Twitter: @sharonnelsonesq




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