The Modern Law Library

Lack of Online Privacy Rights Is Very Troubling, Says Author


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I Know Who You Are
and I Saw What You Did
January 2012
List Price: $26.00

Are you in control of your digital self? ABA Journal web producer Lee Rawles talks with Lori Andrews, author of I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy about the lack of online privacy rights and the need for a social media constitution.

They discuss the changes that social networks have brought to all areas of the law, including evidence gathering; what evidence is admissible in courts; how social media can affect the right to a fair trial; and the right to control one’s image. Andrews touches on how secret data aggregation about your online activities can affect the price of your health insurance, the advertisements you see, what jobs you qualify for and the limits on your credit card balance.

Reviews:

The New York Times: “The Dangers of Sharing”

Kirkus Reviews: “I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did”

The Diane Rehm Show: “I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy”

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In This Podcast:

Lori Andrews

Lori Andrews is a law professor and director of the Institute for Science, Law and Technology at Illinois Institute of Technology. She has served as a regular adviser to the U.S. government on new technologies, including chairing the federal committee concerning ethical and legal issues involved with the Human Genome Project.

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