Recent Issues

February 2005 Issue

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Cover Story

New Test for DUI Defense

Long a staple of many a general law practice, defending clients charged with drunken driving has evolved into a more complex and specialized field.

The changes track the ever-more sophisticated technology used to detect impaired drivers and a cultural shift that has raised the severity of punishment and imposed a stigma on those arrested.

More states now mandate license revocation, alcohol evaluation and treatment, and jail time or house arrest for a conviction for DUI, also known as driving under the influence. (In some jurisdictions, the offense is known as DWI, or driving while intoxicated.) As the stakes increase, defense attorneys need detailed knowledge of how Breathalyzers work, about the physiology of the human body, and about the intricacies of field sobriety tests, say lawyers who represent DUI defendants.

A correction has been made to this story.

Feature Section

    Mud and Money

    Just weeks before the Nov. 2 elections, coal company executive Don L. Blanken­ship issued a statement saying he had contributed “approximately $1 for every West Virginian” in the contest for a supreme court seat. Blankenship was responding to the buzz over his spending $1.7 million of his own money to bring down an in­cum­bent justice he believed was bad for busi­ness.

    Law & Marriage

    Not long after June Baker Laird left a Den­ver law firm in 2000 to join a three-lawyer outpost there for a New Jersey firm, her new partners suggested she re­cruit her husband from his firm.

ABA Connection

New Test for DUI Defense

Long a staple of many a general law practice, defending clients charged with drunken driving has evolved into a more complex and specialized field.

The changes track the ever-more sophisticated technology used to detect impaired drivers and a cultural shift that has raised the severity of punishment and imposed a stigma on those arrested.

More states now mandate license revocation, alcohol evaluation and treatment, and jail time or house arrest for a conviction for DUI, also known as driving under the influence. (In some jurisdictions, the offense is known as DWI, or driving while intoxicated.) As the stakes increase, defense attorneys need detailed knowledge of how Breathalyzers work, about the physiology of the human body, and about the intricacies of field sobriety tests, say lawyers who represent DUI defendants.

Ethics

Duty Calls

McElhaney on Litigation

A Client’s Own Worst Enemy

Corner Office

Intelligent Competition

Ideas from the Front

The Zubulake Road Show

Life Audit

What Not to Wear

President's Message

Justice For All

Executive Director's Report

Global Goals

Report from Governmental Affairs

First Up: Class Action Bill

Obiter Dicta

Fairway Frolics

Keeva on Life and Practice

The Parent of All Virtues