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50 simple ways you can market your practice

Jul 1, 2013, 05:19 am CDT

Comments

What a gold mine of information provided here. Some marketing experts package just half of these key points and sell it on as marketing consultancy strategies. Thanks for sharing and in such simple language.

Karl Obayi
www.itsolicitors.com

By Karl Obayi on 2013 06 26, 5:06 am CDT

#23 - best elevator speech, “hi, I’m a lawyer” - seriously? There is nothing more frightening to the average person than being trapped in an elevator with an attorney!  What if the elevator passenger was a victim of the corruption in our court systems or the incompetence in the legal profession?  The cardinal rule for any speech, elevator or otherwise, is “know thy audience”.  Never corner an absolute stranger in a trapped environment with the revelation that you are a member of a negativity viewed profession!

By NYS Courts ex-wife on 2013 06 28, 6:54 am CDT

If all else fails, try to actually do good work.

By B. McLeod on 2013 06 28, 7:31 am CDT

B. - Doing good work is a given.  It is expected.  It is the minimum.  In fact do great work.  But you still need to separate yourself from everybody else out there especially if you don’t have the benefit of working for a large firm where your plate is always filled by others.  BTW the typical client often doesn’t know the difference between good work and poor work as long as they think they got the best outcome they could.

By Howard Murphy on 2013 06 28, 8:03 am CDT

@#4:  ” BTW the typical client often doesn’t know the difference between good work and poor work as long as they think they got the best outcome they could. “

Of course, the converse is also true - if they don’t get the best outcome they think they should have gotten, then they will think the work was poor no matter how good it was…

By Mitch on 2013 06 28, 9:52 am CDT

I loved Tip #5 sending out cards to celebrate unique and not the traditional holidays.  And for a Memphis lawyer to celebrate Elvis’s birthday- that is just pure genius!  It also shows that you can have fun with marketing and make it tailored to you.  Great tips in a concise format.  Thank you for sharing.

By Vanessa M. Kelly on 2013 06 28, 10:29 am CDT

I gave a speech about this topic——fishing for business from the perspective of the fish.  Lawyers do not look at what the client needs/wants, but from the perspective of what they sell.  Turn around their perspective.

By Retired on 2013 06 28, 7:13 pm CDT

Yes, for the most part this was a nice, comprehensive article, but it did make me wonder, when does an attorney have time to read cases?  At what point do you change from being primary a lawyer to being primarily your own ad agency exec?  I don’t know how others feel about it, but I wanted to be a lawyer—and then to have some time for other pursuits besides self-promotion.

Also, missing was the perspective of what the Model Rules might say about some of these tactics.  Obviously, some of these could land an attorney in a grey area if he or she doesn’t remain cognizant of the Rules and when they may apply.

By Sonja (real name, real spelling) on 2013 06 28, 8:20 pm CDT

@ 8: IMO, an attorney should spend an average of 1-2 hrs. per day reading up on recent developments in their field. Most people can efficiently do this during breaks, over lunch, or instead of the time they waste on FB or Twitter.

By BMF on 2013 07 01, 1:30 pm CDT

@9 - I agree. Attorneys should stay abreast of recent developments.  And, it’s simple to do in the current social and technological environment. Various listserv, industry and professional associations, provide a wealth of information.  Just set aside an hour a day and scroll through the emails and scan stories.  Give a thorough read to those that really capture your attention. You might also consider writing a summary and posting it to your website.

By thoroughly_disgusted on 2013 07 02, 10:18 am CDT

@ 10: What I do is summarize those issues that may be useful in upcoming cases in an online case squibb file. This approach cuts down research time, and also provides plenty of fodder for later postings on websites.

By BMF on 2013 07 02, 12:15 pm CDT

Great article—but you skipped one of the best—publish a newsletter.  You are already an authority but you need to let the world know about it—all in a quiet and professional manner.

By Steve Klinghoffer on 2013 07 03, 2:06 pm CDT

This article is full of great suggestions, but #23 is one I can’t agree with and don’t intend to follow.  It’s extremely impolite to ask a stranger or casual acquaintance flat out, “What do you do?”  Certainly, if you want to know whether that person is employed and valuable to you as part of your network, that’s one way to cut to the chase, but I’m of the opinion that “networking” is never an excuse for rudeness, even inside an elevator.

By E. Velado on 2013 07 10, 2:20 pm CDT

And just for the record, “inside an elevator” was meant as a quip, so no need to correct me of any misconception that we’re actually talking about the large metal alternative to stairs.

By E. Velado on 2013 07 10, 2:28 pm CDT

Comment removed by moderator.

By Mike Loshe on 2013 07 15, 8:31 am CDT

It is evident that much effort was needed for all localized it tricks. Only in my opinion they forgot a very important point also: remain reasonable with the note of fees.

By BELKACEMI MOUSSA on 2013 07 17, 8:51 pm CDT

Hey, even BigLaw maintains “reasonable” fees.  There’s a rule on that, you know. ;)

By B. McLeod on 2013 07 18, 7:16 am CDT

And here are my 50 tips in a blog entry on our firm’s website
http://www.hollinslegal.com/2012/06/05/improving-attorney-client-communications-fifty-tips/

By David Raybin on 2013 07 20, 11:53 am CDT

re Comment 18 - David Raybin - Great tips as well.  Thanks for sharing.

By Doug Lytle on 2013 07 24, 1:11 pm CDT

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ABA Journal

50 simple ways you can market your practice

Jun 28, 2013, 04:53 pm CDT

Comments

What a gold mine of information provided here. Some marketing experts package just half of these key points and sell it on as marketing consultancy strategies. Thanks for sharing and in such simple language.

Karl Obayi
www.itsolicitors.com

By Karl Obayi on 2013 06 26, 5:06 am CDT

#23 - best elevator speech, “hi, I’m a lawyer” - seriously? There is nothing more frightening to the average person than being trapped in an elevator with an attorney!  What if the elevator passenger was a victim of the corruption in our court systems or the incompetence in the legal profession?  The cardinal rule for any speech, elevator or otherwise, is “know thy audience”.  Never corner an absolute stranger in a trapped environment with the revelation that you are a member of a negativity viewed profession!

By NYS Courts ex-wife on 2013 06 28, 6:54 am CDT

If all else fails, try to actually do good work.

By B. McLeod on 2013 06 28, 7:31 am CDT

B. - Doing good work is a given.  It is expected.  It is the minimum.  In fact do great work.  But you still need to separate yourself from everybody else out there especially if you don’t have the benefit of working for a large firm where your plate is always filled by others.  BTW the typical client often doesn’t know the difference between good work and poor work as long as they think they got the best outcome they could.

By Howard Murphy on 2013 06 28, 8:03 am CDT

@#4:  ” BTW the typical client often doesn’t know the difference between good work and poor work as long as they think they got the best outcome they could. “

Of course, the converse is also true - if they don’t get the best outcome they think they should have gotten, then they will think the work was poor no matter how good it was…

By Mitch on 2013 06 28, 9:52 am CDT

I loved Tip #5 sending out cards to celebrate unique and not the traditional holidays.  And for a Memphis lawyer to celebrate Elvis’s birthday- that is just pure genius!  It also shows that you can have fun with marketing and make it tailored to you.  Great tips in a concise format.  Thank you for sharing.

By Vanessa M. Kelly on 2013 06 28, 10:29 am CDT

I gave a speech about this topic——fishing for business from the perspective of the fish.  Lawyers do not look at what the client needs/wants, but from the perspective of what they sell.  Turn around their perspective.

By Retired on 2013 06 28, 7:13 pm CDT

Yes, for the most part this was a nice, comprehensive article, but it did make me wonder, when does an attorney have time to read cases?  At what point do you change from being primary a lawyer to being primarily your own ad agency exec?  I don’t know how others feel about it, but I wanted to be a lawyer—and then to have some time for other pursuits besides self-promotion.

Also, missing was the perspective of what the Model Rules might say about some of these tactics.  Obviously, some of these could land an attorney in a grey area if he or she doesn’t remain cognizant of the Rules and when they may apply.

By Sonja (real name, real spelling) on 2013 06 28, 8:20 pm CDT

@ 8: IMO, an attorney should spend an average of 1-2 hrs. per day reading up on recent developments in their field. Most people can efficiently do this during breaks, over lunch, or instead of the time they waste on FB or Twitter.

By BMF on 2013 07 01, 1:30 pm CDT

@9 - I agree. Attorneys should stay abreast of recent developments.  And, it’s simple to do in the current social and technological environment. Various listserv, industry and professional associations, provide a wealth of information.  Just set aside an hour a day and scroll through the emails and scan stories.  Give a thorough read to those that really capture your attention. You might also consider writing a summary and posting it to your website.

By thoroughly_disgusted on 2013 07 02, 10:18 am CDT

@ 10: What I do is summarize those issues that may be useful in upcoming cases in an online case squibb file. This approach cuts down research time, and also provides plenty of fodder for later postings on websites.

By BMF on 2013 07 02, 12:15 pm CDT

Great article—but you skipped one of the best—publish a newsletter.  You are already an authority but you need to let the world know about it—all in a quiet and professional manner.

By Steve Klinghoffer on 2013 07 03, 2:06 pm CDT

This article is full of great suggestions, but #23 is one I can’t agree with and don’t intend to follow.  It’s extremely impolite to ask a stranger or casual acquaintance flat out, “What do you do?”  Certainly, if you want to know whether that person is employed and valuable to you as part of your network, that’s one way to cut to the chase, but I’m of the opinion that “networking” is never an excuse for rudeness, even inside an elevator.

By E. Velado on 2013 07 10, 2:20 pm CDT

And just for the record, “inside an elevator” was meant as a quip, so no need to correct me of any misconception that we’re actually talking about the large metal alternative to stairs.

By E. Velado on 2013 07 10, 2:28 pm CDT

Comment removed by moderator.

By Mike Loshe on 2013 07 15, 8:31 am CDT

It is evident that much effort was needed for all localized it tricks. Only in my opinion they forgot a very important point also: remain reasonable with the note of fees.

By BELKACEMI MOUSSA on 2013 07 17, 8:51 pm CDT

Hey, even BigLaw maintains “reasonable” fees.  There’s a rule on that, you know. ;)

By B. McLeod on 2013 07 18, 7:16 am CDT

And here are my 50 tips in a blog entry on our firm’s website
http://www.hollinslegal.com/2012/06/05/improving-attorney-client-communications-fifty-tips/

By David Raybin on 2013 07 20, 11:53 am CDT

re Comment 18 - David Raybin - Great tips as well.  Thanks for sharing.

By Doug Lytle on 2013 07 24, 1:11 pm CDT

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