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Is ‘Happy Birthday’ in the public domain? Suit seeks return of license fees

Jun 20, 2013, 11:09 am CDT

Comments

It sounds silly, but if they purchased the legal rights to the song, the public needs to respect that. As a substitute to Happy Birthday, I've always sung my own original conpilation of Queen's greatest hits.

By L'Carpetron Dookmariott on 2013 06 20, 7:54 pm CDT

You are assuming they purchased rights to the entire song, not just the piano arrangement. Aside from that Happy Birthday has become so widely used, if it were a patentable product, it would considered generic.

By TheReasonableWoman on 2013 06 23, 10:17 am CDT

My company has trademarked the phrase "Happy Birthday." Please immediately cease and desist from using it in this article, or appropriate action will be taken forthwith.

By copyright owner on 2013 06 26, 12:57 pm CDT

I'm predicting that if a court rules on this one, Warner's birthday wish will be for a do-over.

By Donald on 2013 06 26, 2:09 pm CDT

if i sing it so offkey it's barely recognizable do i still have to pay up?

By defensive lawyer on 2013 06 26, 3:33 pm CDT

"Happy Birthday has become so widely used, if it were a patentable product, it would considered generic."

Wow... you really demonstrated your ignorance of IP law with that statement.... mixing patent, trademark, and copyright principles in one ridiculous statement.

By hlh on 2013 06 26, 7:57 pm CDT

@ 6: Don't feed the trolls, brah. The name should have been a dead giveaway.

By Jimmy Russels, esq. on 2013 06 28, 5:51 am CDT

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