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‘Conspiracy of Silence’ Allowed Judges’ Kids-for-Cash Scandal to Occur, Says Author

Nov 12, 2012, 02:30 pm CST

Comments

I followed this case since 2008, what a shame it took this long for the Taxpayers, and Victims of theses scumbag Judges to finally be brought to Justice.  And the one judge here that got 28yrs said “Quote”  he did not know what he was doing was wrong!!!  There are more of theses so called “Honorable Judges” out there!!!  I think that a better message would of been sent, if the sentence would of been, taking both of these S.O.B.s and the Owners of the Private Jail out back of the Court House and all of them Shot In The Back Of The Head.  If i remember correctly it cost us Taxpayers Millions of Dollars, and over a year of investigating by the F.B.I. before this whole thing was shut down.  I Know That One Of These Victims A 15yr Old, Committed Suicide.  What A Sad Justice System where its never about “Right Or Wrong”  Its about “Wining And Losing”  And last but not least its about “Money, Greed and Power”  wake up people we are building more “For Profit Private Jails and Prisons” faster then we are Schools.

By Eddie B on 2012 11 13, 12:07 am CST

Agree w/Eddie B.  Shot in the back of the head sounds just about right.

By RC on 2012 11 16, 11:43 am CST

Somewhat ironic that judges in Pennsylvania are not required to take annual CLE courses in ethics.  They need them more than the lawyers do.

By Max L on 2012 11 16, 2:09 pm CST

Eddie B.  I am glad you were first to comment, since you know the deal and showed an appropriate level of outrage.  All of us who have been in juvenile court recognize a good judge and a bad judge.  Too may stories to tell, but, man, it is hard to believe that a judge taking money from a third party that runs a juvenile center to which he sends “kids” could possibly say he didn’t know it was wrong.  The world is becoming more and more “chickenshit” across the board, and the courts have to be the bastion of good behavior.  If you want a geat take on the “game” of the private jails, see Chris Rock’s take.  One line: he sells stock in the prisons to kids in the hood so when they go in they are shareholders, not mere prisoners.

By DeadHead on 2012 11 16, 2:52 pm CST

You don’t need to be close to the juvenile court system to guess what could happen when you have privately operated jails…Look in Arizona…there was a stroy on OPB the other day showing how sheriffs get kickbacks for detaining people…this is what you get when you try to privatize everything…money is a bad incentive. It does not take a genius…

By He Is on 2012 11 16, 3:48 pm CST

Oh yeah, I saw that episode of Law and Order.

By T on 2012 11 16, 3:59 pm CST

@5: Absolutely correct.

Privatization of our prisons is extremely dangerous for society. First, the private prisons offer minimal services to inmates in order to improve profits—undermining the rehabilitative purposes of incarceration. Second, the profit-per-inmate-day incentivizes the prison management to engage in bribery such as this, facilitate inmate-on-inmate crime, and lobby legislatures for lengthier sentencing and more punitive recidivism laws to incarcerate more of our population. Third, allowing a “prison industrial complex” to be established from private capital creates inappropriate and dangerous resistance to progressive programs designed at reducing incarceration rates.

It also leads to flat out extortion: private prison is built and contracted on a promise of (for example) $10 per inmate per day.  Two years pass, and 1000 prisoners are in custody of the private entity. They then return to governing body and say “if we don’t get $15 per inmate per day, we’re closing down.”  Can the government say “no”?  Only if they want to let 1000 people out immediately, since they don’t have the capacity for these people in the public prisons.

By Voice of Reason on 2012 11 16, 4:35 pm CST

Aawww, shucks fellers…. these Randians were just doing what felt good to themselves.

By RO on 2012 11 16, 4:42 pm CST

I have been wondering over the years if i would ever see an outcome on this case, and i figured that the judge would of just got a slap on the hand or something like that, and not held accountable just like most of the corrupted police officers when they get caught doing wrong, i see it all the time police officer are rarely held accountable for wrong doing.  Owe yea i watch “Law and Order” to and by they way i am not a lawyer i am just a “dumb plumber” who stumbled across this web site and was hooked after reading so many of B. McLeod’s Comments.  I learned one thing about reading his comments and that is to make sure that i am not eating or drinking, because whatever is in my mouth could very well end all over the computer screen, ya gotta love em!!!  Love that McLeod, and i hope he stays here on the ABA.  Eddie B

By Eddie B on 2012 11 16, 4:56 pm CST

@7 Voice of Reason.  Beautifully Put And Very True!!!

By Eddie B on 2012 11 16, 7:41 pm CST

I love William Ecenbarger!

By Tom Youngjohn on 2012 11 17, 3:13 am CST

How about Cash for Illegals?
Check out this article:
“Private Prison Companies Behind the Scenes of Arizona’s Immigration Law” at prisonlegalnews.org

By John B. on 2012 11 18, 9:14 am CST

I wanted to read the above article, but I couldn’t find it.

By Tom Youngjohn on 2012 11 18, 8:03 pm CST

Eddie:  I disagree, I think a long drop on a short rope would be preferable and then leave them to rot on a gibbet.  When we privatize prisons and make them a corporate profit center, this is what we can expect.  I couldn’t find the article referenced by John B. either but the premise doesn’t surpise me.  Once you have corporations running prisons for a profit, they’re going to want to maximize profit by increasing the number of prisoners, whether they’re guilty or not and whether it makes sense to have those particular persons in jail or not.

By George Sly on 2012 11 19, 12:42 am CST

In New York we have not privatized our treatment of troubled children and families.  In the last 5 years of record (ending 2009,) there have been 784,398 “hotline” reports of child abuse to the State Central Register, 283,750 for NYC.  (This does not include mandated reporters, such as teachers, doctors, etc.)

Each of these reports results in an intrusion of the highest order by ACS or an equivalent agency.  ACS is the de facto intake and investigative branch of our Family Court.  Our Family Courts routinely issue orders of protection and exclusive custody during ex-parte proceedings without any requirement for objective evidence.  Fundamental rights to Due Process, speedy and public trials are sacrificed for administrative convenience due to overcrowding.  Psychologists are assigned for forensic (litigation) rather than theraputic purposes.  These judges, with overflowing dockets are the only ones responsible for ascertaining and acting in the best interests of the children.

Penal Law 240.50(4) makes the false reporting of such an incident an A Misdemeanor.  According to the office of Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown, there has *never* been an arrest or prosecution for violation of this statute. 

Do these numbers suggest the NY system of predominantly government agencies and individuals, funded by federal monies, is perfect?

By Ike Aruti, Esq. on 2012 11 20, 8:34 pm CST

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