Law Firms

16-Lawyer Group Exits Cetrulo for Boston Office of Nelson Mullins


A 16-lawyer litigation team, led by a name partner, has exited Cetrulo & Capone for the Boston office of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough.

The contingent, which will work in two groups, focuses on construction and surety law and product liability and catastrophic accident litigation. The total attorney roster for Nelson Mullins in Boston now numbers 55, and the southeast regional firm expects continued growth, spokesman Joseph Donovan tells the ABA Journal. Its Boston office had two lawyers in 2008.

The 16-lawyer departure leaves their former firm, which is now known as Cetrulo with 32 attorneys, according to its website. The exit had been under discussion for months and was amicable, representing a split of practice entities that were already separate and distinct and had no overlapping clients, said managing partner Lawrence G. “Larry” Cetrulo.

“We wish him good luck,” he says of his former partner of 17 years, Bert Capone, adding that his own contingent, which focuses on complex litigation and toxic tort defense work is also anticipating a bright future. “We’re all looking forward,” Cetrulo told the ABA Journal. “Nobody’s looking back.”

Nelson Mullins has approximately 400 lawyers in 13 offices in the Carolinas, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Tennessee, West Virginia and Washington, D.C.

Donovan said the firm had a very good year in 2012, although he doesn’t have final figures because the numbers are still being calculated. He says the firm’s recipe for success is simply providing good service to its existing clients.

“There’s no secret sauce,” he said, explaining “The service that we’ve been able to provide our clients and our relationship with our clients has clearly led to our growth, and that has helped us attract the best and brightest.”

A Boston Business Journal article and a Nelson Mullins press release provide further details.

Hat tip: Boston Herald.

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