International Law

Clinton Blames Failed Policy & 'Insatiable' US Market for 'Horrific' Drug War


A failed interdiction approach unsuccessfully pursued by the United States for decades, as well as an “insatiable” demand in this country for illegal drugs. Both are partly to blame for a “horrific” Mexican drug war characterized by an explosion of violence that is spilling into this country, the U.S. Secretary of State said today.

Speaking with reporters at the start of a two-day trip to Mexico, Hillary Clinton offered what the the Washington Post describes as a “stark mea culpa.”

“Clearly what we’ve been doing has not worked,” says Clinton, who also pointed to U.S. weapons, reportedly used in the vast majority of Mexican drug violence, as part of the problem.

Her comments follow an announcement yesterday by the Obama administration that it would be sending more federal agents and supplies in an effort to intercept weapons and money flowing from the U.S. to Mexico. Border states here have been expressing concern about ongoing reports that drug-related violence against Mexican police and officials is crossing into our country. More than 7,000 Mexicans reportedly have been killed in drug-related violence since 2008.

However, what the Obama administration is now planning still isn’t a sufficient response, Sen. Joe Lieberman said today at a hearing of the Homeland Security Committee he chairs, reports Reuters.

“The danger here is clear and present,” Lieberman said. “It threatens to get worse.”

As discussed in earlier ABAJournal.com posts, a number of Mexican police officers have been assassinated, corruption is an issue amongst some of the country’s drug prosecutors and kidnappings for ransom are becoming more common on both sides of the border.

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