Question of the Week

Have You Ever Had to Fight Weather to Keep Working?


At the time of this writing, those of us in Chicago are knee-deep (at least) in snow. But ABAJournal.com soldiers on, even though most of us are working remotely. County courts are closed, but Mayer Brown, which has some of its worldwide information technology aspects centralized in the Windy City, put some staffers up in downtown hotels Tuesday night to keep the firm’s “24-hour operation” running but officially closed the office for Wednesday.

As we read the headlines about this blizzard and remember the headlines and images from New York City’s blizzard at the end of 2010, we want to ask: Have you ever had to fight weather to keep working? Have you been forced to get yourself somewhere even when it was truly unsafe to travel? Have you had to sleep at the office because of a natural disaster waiting to happen outside? Although we have blizzards on the brain, your horror stories from hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes are welcome.

Share your harrowing tales in the comments.

Read the answers to last week’s question: Can Document Review Work Help You Grow as a Lawyer?

Featured answer:

From Doc Reviewer 3 years’ answer: “Document review is generally boring and bad for your body. For active types, it’s depressing. You work eight to 12 hours usually with a 1/2 hour lunch break. Your back and knees hurt. You develop migraines. You gain weight. You become a good reader at a fast pace, but there is no comparison between writing legal documents and scanning them. You can be laid off at any time, and there is no job security and there are no benefits. About half of the recruiters are solicitous when they want you and often rude when you need them. … The two best things about it are the gratitude I felt upon opening my own practice, and the fortune I’ve had in retaining some excellent friends from those days who are helpful to me now both personally and professionally. If avoidable, document review is not a healthy choice, physically, emotionally, professionally or intellectually.”

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