Question of the Week

How do you get through the day after a losing verdict?


What do you do in your work-related
“Charlie Brown moments”?

Seattle plaintiffs attorney Karen Koehler came out on the losing side of a jury verdict recently and reflected on the loss, and more pointedly, on how lawyers cope in such situations. She wrote at her blog, the Velvet Hammer, about the day after.

First and foremost, she consoled her client. She also thought about what other choices she could have made and mentally banged her head against the wall. She sorted through condolence emails and inspirational emails sent to her by mentors, friends and colleagues. One of those messages advised her to go and see a movie as soon as possible. That afternoon and evening, she went to thrift stores, the farmer’s market, picked up dinner at a falafel stand, read Danielle Steel, went running with her dog and went to see Fast & Furious 6. An action movie was definitely the way to go, she thought.

Whether we’re trial lawyers or not, in the course of our careers we all have to live with the fallout of wrongs that can’t be righted, mistakes we made that can’t be fixed, or being rejected in some way. So this week, we’d like to ask you: How do you get through the day after a losing verdict (or the equivalent)? What goes on inside your head, and how do you try to soothe the pain of looking back so you can start looking forward to the next work tasks that need your focus?

Answer in the comments.

Read the answers to last week’s question: Does wining and dining clients get you work?

Featured answer:

Posted by Jason Tortorici: “Entertaining clients is more about building the relationship than a quid pro quo. I still treat clients to a meal or sporting event but never with the expectation that my client or prospect will respond by hiring me. The meal or event provides a great one on one opportunity where I can get to know the person, from whom I hope to receive work, a little better and develop a trust and rapport with that person.”

Do you have an idea for a future question of the week? If so, contact us.

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