Internet Law

Jailed WikiLeaks Founder Put in Segregation, as 1st Individual Is Detained in Hack Attacks


Jailed WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denies, through his legal counsel, that he had anything to do with recent hack attacks on organizations perceived as hostile to his website. And he asserts that WikiLeaks is a news publishing site, not a hack site, Australian Broadcasting Corporation News reports.

However, the 39-year-old has been transferred to a segregation unit where he will have only limited Internet access as he awaits extradition from Great Britain to Sweden in a sex-crime case, reports the Guardian. It heated up after WikiLeaks dumped secret U.S. State Department cables onto the Web, and Assange’s legal team says he expects to be extradited from Sweden to the United States.

Meanwhile, a teenager accused of being involved in the revenge attacks is being questioned by Dutch police, reports the Law & Disorder blog of Ars Technica. He is the first individual identified by authorities in connection with the apparent denial-of-service attacks discussed in an earlier ABAJournal.com post.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says the feds are investigating the hack attacks, Bloomberg reports.

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