Legal Ethics

'King of latex' judge follows ex-mistress and wife on stand in judicial misconduct trial


Given earlier developments in two legal ethics cases against a Detroit judge, observers expected a colorful hearing Tuesday when suspended Wayne County Circuit Judge Wade McCree took the stand in his judicial misconduct trial.

And they were not disappointed, reports MLive.com.

Speaking following testimony by his ex-mistress, Geniene La’Shay Mott, and his wife of 25 years, LaVerne McCree, the judge said he was surprised at the bad turn the extramarital relationship took at the end, when Mott showed up at his home on Nov. 1 and began pounding on the door and threatening to call the media. “I did not think it would get to that extreme. To me this was already bad television the way it was going down,” he testified.

McCree said Mott wanted him to divorce his wife and marry her, and upped the ante during the visit to his home by claiming she was pregnant with his child. This, however, he doubted, proclaiming himself to be the “king of latex.”

Earlier, Mott testified that the judge had sex with her in chambers several times and texted her when he was on the bench. The two met when she was a witness in a child-support case that McCree was presiding over, and he admittedly continued to do even after becoming involved with Mott.

However, the judge said his relationship with Mott did not affect his treatment of the father in the child-support case, reports the Detroit Free Press, and portrayed his failure to recuse himself as a careless mistake.

“It was an absolute pure oversight,” he testified. “I should have recused myself from that case and transferred it to another judge in a more timely manner. I did not.”

The hearing is expected to resume next Tuesday, when McCree’s testimony will continue.

See also:

ABAJournal.com: “Judge admits sex with witness in chambers, but says it didn’t affect his decision-making”

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