Article

Little Corruption Found in Vote-Fraud Crackdown


Records from the U.S. Justice Department’s five-year crackdown on vote fraud show most problems are isolated activities rather than organized corruption, the New York Times reports.

As of last year, about 120 people had been charged and 86 convicted in vote fraud cases.

Many of the offenses occur because of immigrants and felons who apparently don’t understand the rules, or voters who fill out more than one registration form, the newspaper said.

“If they found a single case of a conspiracy to affect the outcome of a congressional election or a statewide election, that would be significant,” says professor and election law expert Richard L. Hasen of Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. “But what we see is isolated, small-scale activities that often have not shown any kind of criminal intent.”

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