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New Reed Smith office in Houston now has 17 attorneys and is looking to hire more

Posted Feb 26, 2013 1:44 PM CDT
By Martha Neil

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Last month Reed Smith announced that the law firm had established an office in the hot Houston market and was looking to hire lawyers for what is eventually expected to be a 50-attorney roster there.

And now, a little over a month later, Reed Smith on Tuesday announced that its new Houston office has 17 lawyers, including 12 partners from the local offices of seven well-known firms who have joined the new venture. Additional hires are expected in upcoming months, a law firm representative tells the ABA Journal in an email.

A 13th partner, David A. Thompson is the "integration partner" for Houston. Thompson is splitting his time between Houston and San Francisco, where he had formerly served as managing partner beginning in 2003, and Reed Smith explains in its announcement that the firm routinely puts a senior partner into a new office in this leading role to help incoming lawyers acclimate to its way of doing things.

The Houston office is the first in Texas for Reed Smith and the law firm's 14th in the U.S. and 25th global office. It will initially focus heavily on energy matters, with six of the new partners, as well as Thompson, practicing in this arena. But more hires are expected in additional practice areas.

“Establishing an office in Houston is an important strategic objective for the firm,” said global managing partner Gregory B. Jordan in the firm's announcement today. “We are very excited to get this important office off the ground with such a strong and balanced group of partners who are already well known and very accomplished in the Houston market. It provides significant benefit to Reed Smith’s clients in the energy and natural resources industry sectors, and further complements our premier practices in commodities and trading, renewables, and natural gas.”

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