Government Law

NYC Bans Supersize Sugary Drinks at Restaurants and Theaters; Juice, Booze Among the Exceptions


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In a move critics call an excessive governmental intrusion, the New York City Board of Health on Thursday adopted a regulation that prohibits the sale of large, sugary drinks at restaurants and theaters, as well as some other eateries, including many workplace cafeterias.

It is the first such ban in the country, Reuters reports.

Those that violate the rule against selling non-diet soda, sweetened tea and similar beverages in cups larger than 16 ounces can now be fined $200, according to the Associated Press and the New York Daily News.

Supermarkets and convenience food stores, however, can continue to sell large sizes of pop. Also, certain beverages including milk, juice and booze are all excepted from the ban. It is expected to take effect in six months.

The purpose of the ban is to improve public health.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. to include information from Reuters.

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