Law Schools

Most Useful Law School Elective Was Evidence, GW Alumni Survey Finds


Evidence is the most useful elective law school course, according to an email survey of George Washington University law school alumni.

The school asked about 13,500 alumni to list their most useful elective courses and the courses they wish they had taken, report the Volokh Conspiracy and the Wall Street Journal Law Blog. There were 576 responses to the January survey (PDF), according to a summary (PDF).

The top five most useful electives identified by alumni were:

1) Evidence (156 votes)

2) Administrative law (120 votes)

3) Corporations (105 votes)

4) Trial advocacy (71 votes)

5) Federal income tax (47 votes)

The top courses alumni wish they had taken were:

1) Complex litigation (50 votes)

2) Administrative law (48 votes)

3) Pretrial advocacy (46 votes)

4) Trial advocacy (44 votes)

5) Corporate finance (41 votes)

Some courses got no votes at all, including Asian Americans and the law, comparative public procurement, international environmental law, and the international rights of women.

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