Criminal Justice

Whitey Bulger guilty of multiple counts in split verdict, likely will spend rest of life in prison


After 30 hours of deliberation, a federal jury in Boston has reached a split verdict in the case of accused gangland murderer James J. “Whitey” Bulger, who reportedly escaped criminal consequences for decades with the help of cash gifts and helpful relationships with authorities.

He was found guilty of conspiracy, racketeering and murder, including 11 of the 19 slayings in which he had been accused in a 32-count indictment of playing a role, according to the Associated Press and the Boston Herald.

Another Associated Press article lists the jury’s verdict on each count, and an additional Associated Press article lists key events in Bulger’s life. CBS News’ Crimesider blog and CNN also have stories about Monday’s verdict.

Bulger, now 83, did not react to the jury’s decision. He was accused of committing the crimes while simultaneously leading the Winter Hill Gang and, as a claimed FBI informant between 1975 and 1990, feeding the bureau information about the rival New England Mafia.

He became a fugitive in 1994, following a tip from a retired FBI agent that he was about to face indictment. However, the FBI used Twitter to help capture Bulger in 2011 by blasting his girlfriend’s photo in a tweet.

A substantial prison term appears likely and, given Bulger’s age, any prison term he gets will probably keep him behind bars for the rest of his life. His sentencing is scheduled for November.

See also:

ABAJournal.com (2008): “1st Circuit: Gov’t Must Pay $3.1M to Family of Man Slain By FBI Agent’s Informants”

ABAJournal.com (2008): “Ex-FBI Agent Convicted in 1982 Murder for Tipping Gangsters”

ABAJournal.com (2012): “Former US Atty Gave Whitey Bulger Immunity to Commit Crime, Says Defense Motion to Remove Judge”

ABAJournal.com (2013): “Judge is tossed from Whitey Bulger case in appellate opinion by Souter”

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