Celebrities

1223 ABA Journal Celebrities articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Law student expelled after posting flyers; Harvey Weinstein reportedly reaches $25M deal

Suspended law student is expelled after posting ‘okay to be white’ flyers

A suspended law student at Oklahoma City University was expelled after he posted flyers reading “It’s okay to…

The curious case of A$AP Rocky

Five months after his release from detention in a Swedish jail, A$AP Rocky returned to Stockholm to perform Wednesday. It’s a surprise comeback for the rapper, who was jailed for nearly 30 days this summer after his arrest on suspicion of assault. The case made international headlines and trained an unprecedented level of scrutiny on the criminal justice system of a country normally lauded for its progressive ideals.

Afternoon Briefs: SCOTUS won’t review abortion ultrasound law; 9th Circuit edits its Taylor Swift decision

Supreme Court won’t review Kentucky abortion law requiring ultrasounds

The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to hear a challenge to a Kentucky law requiring doctors to display fetal ultrasounds and…

How ‘Legally Blonde’ influenced a generation of women lawyers

What was once seen as another rom-com about a sorority girl tackling Harvard Law to get the love of her life back became something much more to female law students and women lawyers. Years later, Elle Woods remains influential for women in the legal field.

Can ‘SNL’ star Pete Davidson really collect $1M from fans who violate his nondisclosure agreement?
Saturday Night Live comedian Pete Davidson may scare fans into keeping quiet with a $1 million nondisclosure agreement, but it’s unlikely he will be able to enforce the contract in court, legal experts say.
Is ‘The Irishman’ right about Hoffa? US attorney promises ‘more to come’
The U.S. attorney for the office that investigated Jimmy Hoffa’s disappearance isn’t relying on the Netflix movie The Irishman for its theories of the case. Nor is a law professor whose stepfather was portrayed as the man who drove Hoffa to his death.
BigLaw partner’s fight against chemical company is chronicled in new film
A new film called Dark Waters chronicles a BigLaw partner's 18-year environmental fight against the DuPont chemical company.
Pro se litigants in pop culture show why representing yourself can be a dangerous decision

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals has a weekly mailing list that sends out the court’s published and unpublished cases. They arrive in quick succession every Thursday morning. It’s a…

Afternoon Briefs: Madonna sued over late start time of concert; unusual bar ceremony goes viral

Fan sues Madonna for pushing back start time of her concert

A Florida man who spent more than $1,000 on three tickets to see singer Madonna in concert at her…

Afternoon Briefs: Andrew Yang didn’t last long in BigLaw; suit against Taylor Swift revived

Andrew Yang lasted only five months in BigLaw

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang left Davis Polk & Wardwell in 2000 after spending only five months as an associate. He had…

Afternoon Briefs: Indiana AG defends his law license; Secret Service asked rapper Eminem about lyrics

Indiana AG testifies his touching at party wasn’t ‘lewd’

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill testified last week in an ethics hearing that he is “a fun guy” who likely made…

Panama Papers law firm sues Netflix for libel over portrayal in Meryl Streep film

Updated: The hacked Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca and its two name partners have sued Netflix for libel over their portrayal in the film The Laundromat.

The lawsuit claims…

‘Parks and Recreation’ reminds us how important court reporters are to the legal system

Court stenographers, or “court reporters” as they are commonly referred to, are often left overshadowed and underappreciated. But proper and reliable conclusions to controversies would not be possible without their invaluable work, says lawyer Adam Banner.

Venture capital firm sues its former general counsel, once a child actress on ‘The Wonder Years’
A lawyer who portrayed Becky Slater on The Wonder Years, a TV show than ran from 1988 to 1993, is facing a lawsuit of more than $1 million stemming from her work as a general counsel for a venture capital firm.
Afternoon Briefs: Judge OKs ID using altered photo; infants seized for parents’ vitamin refusal, suit says

Judge allows eyewitness IDs based on altered mug shot

A federal judge in Portland, Oregon, has refused to toss tellers’ identification of a suspected bank robber based on a…

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