Juvenile Justice

421 ABA Journal Juvenile Justice articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Legal words flummox child murder defendant; judge nixes ‘The Godfather Part II’ clip

News Roundup

Judge urges former teen serial killer to donate his brain to science
A Pennsylvania judge who resentenced a convicted serial killer on Tuesday urged the man to consider donating his brain to scientists studying criminal behavior.
Afternoon Briefs: 9-year-old is charged with murder; court nominee won’t answer Ukraine questions

9-year-old boy is charged with murder

A 9-year-old boy in central Illinois has been charged with arson and five counts of murder for allegedly causing a mobile home fire in…

Afternoon Briefs: Murder charge against 9-year-old tossed; judge bans mystery proceedings

Judge tosses murder charge against 9-year-old boy

A murder defendant cried and hugged his father after Michigan Judge David Tomlinson tossed a murder charge against him Friday. The defendant was…

Seattle lawyer focuses on systemic changes to end youth homelessness
Three lawyers are among this year’s MacArthur Foundation ‘genius grant’ winners

Lawyers working in the field of criminal justice reform, restorative justice and cyber harassment are among this year’s 26 MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” winners.

The winners will each receive a…

Afternoon Briefs: Officer fired after arrest of 6-year-olds; judge orders Trump deposition

School resource officer fired after arresting two 6-year-olds

A school resource officer has been fired by the Orlando Police Department after arresting two 6-year-old children Thursday. Officials initially said the…

ABA urges Supreme Court to follow Miller standard for juvenile punishments
In an amicus brief filed Tuesday, the ABA urged the U.S. Supreme Court to recognize that juveniles’ “diminished culpability and greater prospects for reform” separate them from adults and that those whose crimes “reflect transient immaturity, rather than irreparable corruption” should not face life in prison.
Students of color with disabilities are being pushed into the school-to-prison pipeline, study finds
Liberating criminal justice data: How a Florida law provides a blueprint for the nation

In a self-imposed Sisyphean task, the team at Measures for Justice travels the U.S. unearthing, collecting and publishing criminal justice data. Today, Christian Gossett, district attorney for Winnebago County, Wisconsin, says more people are being released quicker pretrial, and he’s working with researchers to improve equity in diversion, thanks to the initial data made available by Measures for Justice.

What I got for Father’s Day: Reflecting on parenthood, the law and justice

Attorney William Horton says his family is probably a bit different than most. And that difference has changed him, as a lawyer, as a citizen and as a human being.

In this state, almost all juveniles in detention facilities have at least 1 psychiatric diagnosis

In many school districts in New Mexico, juveniles with disabilities are disproportionately referred to police, according to an analysis of federal data by an investigative reporting group.

At least 29…

Public defender had PTSD from representing sex offenders, EEOC says in disability suit

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has filed a lawsuit claiming that the Defender Association of Philadelphia discriminated against a public defender who experienced mental health issues partly from representing sex…

Lawsuit says diversion program meant to keep troubled kids out of the criminal justice system violates their constitutional rights

A class action lawsuit, pending in federal court for the Central District of California, alleges that the Riverside County Probation Department violates youths’ due process rights, their Fourth Amendment right to be free from unlawful searches and seizures and their First Amendment right to associate with others. The ACLU argues that placement on “informal” probation leaves juveniles worse off than no intervention at all. One reason is that information gleaned through the program can be used against juveniles in future court cases; another is that children who participate in the program are presumed ineligible for diversion if they’re subsequently arrested.

Juvenile lifer, now 72, won landmark Supreme Court case but remains behind bars

A 72-year-old Louisiana inmate who was 17 when he killed a sheriff’s deputy must remain in prison, despite his U.S. Supreme Court victory in January 2016.

Parole was denied for…

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