ABA Journal

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Bar exam alternatives on docket of ABA Legal Ed council

With some states already moving toward alternative attorney licensing, the council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar will consider a draft policy statement urging jurisdictions to consider a host of methods to licensure when it meets Friday.



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Lawyer's true-crime book explores how he defended a neurodivergent client charged with murder

Updated: In 1997, in the small town of Ringgold in northwest Georgia, a reclusive man was accused of keeping his wife captive in his home and murdering her. A local politician-turned-defense attorney took on the case.



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Federal judge halts new US rules limiting credit card late fees

A federal judge on Friday temporarily blocked the U.S. government from trying to limit credit card late fees, siding with banks and other business lobbyists that had challenged the policy as unconstitutional.



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Justice Clarence Thomas calls criticism of him ‘nastiness’ and ‘lies’

After facing harsh questions about his judicial decisions and accepting lavish gifts from a billionaire, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas forcefully pushed back on his critics Friday—saying he and his wife, Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, have endured “nastiness” and “lies.”



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Ice cream lover ‘stated her case for pistachio pretention,’ federal judge says in refusing to toss suit

A federal judge has allowed a disappointed pistachio ice cream consumer to proceed with her deceptive-practices case against the corporation that owns Cold Stone Creamery.



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Solicitors general, past and present, reflect on ups and downs of job and arguing before SCOTUS

It isn’t often that a bipartisan group of U.S. solicitors general gather in public to discuss their unique role in the legal system and even gripe a little about the U.S. Supreme Court. But that’s what happened recently in a packed hotel ballroom before the ABA 2024 Litigation Section Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.



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Catholic school can fire gay drama teacher for marrying, 4th Circuit rules

One of the most liberal appellate courts in the country has ruled that a Catholic high school could fire a teacher for marrying another man, a victory for conservative and religious advocacy groups that have pushed back against anti-discrimination law.



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Looking for practice advice on email discussion lists? Don't forget client confidentiality responsibilities

Lawyers must be careful in revealing information about clients on an email discussion list group, even when seeking help in the representation, according to a new ABA ethics opinion.



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Bosses mandated them back to the office. They took legal action instead

After more than two years of fighting against return-to-office mandates, workers are fed up with their bosses’ inflexible policies and are taking their battle to court.



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Lowered bar pass cut scores mean better bar pass rates in 4 states

Of the five states that lowered the minimum score required for passing the bar last year, four of them had increases in their February 2024 bar passage rates, according to the latest data compiled by the National Conference of Bar Examiners.



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Trump again found in contempt for violating gag, threatened with jail

A judge ruled Monday that Donald Trump again violated his gag order in the New York hush money trial, and he warned the former president that he would consider jailing Trump if the violations continue.



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Texas man files legal action to probe ex-partner's out-of-state abortion

As soon as Collin Davis found out his ex-partner was planning to travel to Colorado to have an abortion in late February, the Texas man retained a high-powered antiabortion attorney—who court records show immediately issued a legal threat.



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Fighting the bots is the new attorney niche

Updated: From lookalike photos to hallucination errors to copyright infringement, the rise of lawsuits against generative artificial intelligence tools reveals a growing frustration with our silicon assistants. Naturally, lawyers are here to help.



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BigLaw firm introduces coaching and support for lawyers who have ADHD

There are law firms in which Carrie Garber Siegrist, a senior associate in the Washington, D.C., office of Goodwin Procter, might have had to be secretive about her diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, also known as ADHD. But at Goodwin Procter, Garber Siegrist says, she feels embraced and supported.



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Slate for 2024-2025 term announced by ABA Legal Ed Section

The ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar has announced its 2024-2025 council slate.



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Lawyer's new book traces today's true-crime fascination to salacious 1800s murder trial

The case of Polly Bodine is the subject of Alex Hortis’ new book, The Witch of New York. But a whodunnit is only part of the story that Hortis, the associate university counsel at the University of Maryland Baltimore, sets out to tell. The book’s subtitle shares the rest: “The cursed birth of tabloid justice.”



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You can't litigate your way into Kentucky Derby, says Churchill Downs' general counsel

The Kentucky Derby has long been known as “the fastest two minutes in sports,” but the 150th Run for the Roses on Saturday will take place without Muth, a horse some say may have been the fastest in the field this year.



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One thing is already clear at Trump's NY trial: Nobody liked Michael Cohen

At times during former President Donald Trump’s hush money trial, the testimony has been just as devastating to Trump’s former attorney Michael Cohen, who will be a key prosecution witness later this month.



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Attorney general moves to reclassify marijuana as lower-risk drug

Attorney General Merrick Garland on Tuesday recommended loosening restrictions on marijuana, a historic shift in federal drug policy that could broaden access to the drug for medicinal use and boost cannabis industries in states where it is legal.



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Less litigation, more practical skills in law school needed, junior associates say

Almost half of law school associates say law school didn’t prepare them for practice, with a lack of training in practical experience cited most often as the reason why, according to a new study released Monday.



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Trump found in contempt for violating gag order in hush money trial

The judge in Donald Trump’s New York hush money trial found the former president in contempt Tuesday for his critical public statements as proceedings entered their third week.



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Can this VC firm invest in only Black women? Fearless Fund faces court challenge

They might be courtroom adversaries, but Arian Simone swears she and the man suing her venture capital firm want the same thing: an America where race does not matter.



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Court says state health-care plans can’t exclude gender-affirming surgery

A federal appellate court in Richmond became the first in the country to rule that state health-care plans must pay for gender-affirming surgeries, a major win for transgender rights amid a nationwide wave of anti-trans activism and legislation.



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Increased interest in LSAT forces additional test date

Because of intense demand, an additional fourth day has been added to the June administration of the primary Law School Admission Test. As of April 26, more than 36,000 students had registered for the June LSAT.



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