Podcasts

cyborg face

Asked and Answered

Could you be replaced by a robot lawyer?

Do you really need a human for the so-called human touch in lawyering, particularly when a big part of the job is convincing the client to be reasonable? Maybe not, according to some people who created apps that they claim help people accomplish tasks traditionally carried out by lawyers.

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The Modern Law Library

Meet 9 American women shortlisted for the Supreme Court before Sandra Day O’Connor

As early as the 1930s, presidents were considering putting the first woman on the U.S. Supreme Court. So, who were these other candidates on the short list, and why did it take until 1981 for Sandra Day O'Connor to become the first female justice?

Legal Rebels Podcast

How hosting a national pandemic summit aided the Nebraska courts system with its COVID-19 response

When the novel coronavirus began sweeping across the U.S. earlier this year, Nebraska’s judicial system was better prepared to rapidly adjust its operations than some of its counterparts in other states.

The Modern Law Library

An insider’s guide to succeeding in law school⁠—even during the COVID-19 pandemic

Andrew Guthrie Ferguson says that near the end of every school year, he has law students come into his office "usually in tears." They tell the professor that if they'd only known at the start of the year what they'd figured out by the end of the year, they'd be so much further ahead.

Asked and Answered

Trials and tiaras: How do pageant winners fare as lawyers?

What are two activities where success comes from reading a room, speaking with authority and not appearing nervous, even if you are? Trying cases in court and also beauty pageants.

The Modern Law Library

Journalist investigating wrongful convictions turns lens on white-collar criminal case in Chicago

Legal Rebels Podcast

Online estate planning sees surge during coronavirus crisis

The online estate-planning platform Trust & Will saw at least a 100% increase in business in March amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Cody Barbo, the company’s CEO and co-founder.

The Modern Law Library

How to develop your horse sense with equine law

Julie Fershtman has developed a niche practice helping people who love horses deal with the particular joys and challenges that come with equine businesses. She is one of the nation's best-known lawyers serving many facets of the horse industry.

Asked and Answered

How to practice law remotely and efficiently during the COVID-19 crisis

As people across the country are coping with countless changes in light of the novel coronavirus pandemic, the ABA Journal’s Asked and Answered podcast is taking a break from its regularly scheduled programing to share information with lawyers about how they can adjust to the world’s current situation—such as having to work from home, whether they want to or not.

The Modern Law Library

What should you read about COVID-19? We asked an epidemiologist

With a barrage of information and misinformation about COVID-19 coming our way, it can be hard to evaluate what sources are trustworthy and where to go for reliable medical news. So for this new episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles called her friend Mary Lancaster, an epidemiologist for the federal government.

Legal Rebels Podcast

President of the Legal Services Corp. reflects on his tenure

Asked to reflect on his nine-year tenure as president of the Legal Services Corp., Jim Sandman says he is proud of many things that he and his team accomplished.

The Modern Law Library

How to achieve vocal power in and out of the courtroom

Public speaking is a crucial part of working as a lawyer. It is especially important for female lawyers who are claiming their vocal authority in speaking roles in courts.

The Modern Law Library

2 families connected by LA riots collide in ‘Your House Will Pay’

The riots in South Los Angeles in 1992 may be nearly three decades old, but in the present day, two families in the novel Your House Will Pay will find that the events from that time are far from over.

Asked and Answered

Why did a Georgia city prohibit tattoos on Sundays?

These days, people from all walks of life get tattoos. But in Columbus, Georgia, it was illegal to give them on Sundays, until recently. No one knows for sure what led to the law, but some suspect that it was what’s known as a “blue law,” a term for state and municipal regulations that prohibits commerce on Sundays, when lawmakers thought people should be in church.

Legal Rebels Podcast

How 2 Texas lawyers are marketing their practice through song

Thanks to social media and the internet, it’s never been easier—or more affordable—for lawyers to advertise. On the other hand, having so many avenues available to lawyers makes it more difficult for anyone to stand out from the crowd.

The Modern Law Library

How safe is your right to vote?

The Constitution of the United States has been amended multiple times since it was written to expand the franchise of voting from the original beneficiaries, white male landowners. But the story of voting rights in the United States is not just one of expansion; there have been periods (such as after Reconstruction) where voting rights that had once been exercised were blocked off, extinguished and suppressed.

Asked and Answered

Getting real: What happens when clients go on reality TV

Imagine you are meeting a client for the first time, and they show up with a TV camera crew that wants to film your meeting.

The Modern Law Library

The court of public opinion: Why litigation PR is a critical component of a case

A lawyer’s duties do not begin and end at the courtroom door. They extend beyond the courtroom to the proverbial court of public opinion. In this era of instantaneous exchanges, there should always be an effective litigation communications plan in place before a case is filed, or worse, it goes awry.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Reinventing the staid field of legal academic writing

Legal academic publishing isn't synonymous with innovation. The mere mention of it can, for some, bring up repressed memories of the most banal and stuffy aspects of law school. But the Massachusetts Institute of Technology wants to change that.

The Modern Law Library

How to kick off 2020 with more productive business meetings

When considering our New Year’s resolutions, we all want to be more resourceful with our time, especially with our workdays. We don’t realize how much time meetings can take up if they are conducted in an inefficient manner.

Asked and Answered

The financial costs for firms when women and minority lawyers leave

When senior associates leave large law firms before making partner, it costs approximately $2 million per piece—when you figure in training and recruitment costs, both coming and going.

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