Copyright Law

761 ABA Journal Copyright Law articles.

Fair game: Does the fair use doctrine apply to Andy Warhol’s pop art?
The acclaimed “Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again” exhibit of more than 400 of Andy Warhol’s works has been making the rounds from New York to San Francisco to Chicago. Even casual observers have a sense of Warhol’s groundbreaking pop-art style. Yet there is one surprising legal question of fair use and transformative value that begs consideration: Just what is a “Warhol”?
Poll: Which ABA Journal magazine cover from 2019 was your favorite?

We’ve covered a wide array of diverse, in-depth and hard-hitting legal topics this past year at the ABA Journal.

Most recently, we ran a feature story about lawyers who…

Getting social: Check out our 8 favorite Instagram posts from this year

It’s hard to believe that 2020 is right around the corner.

Over the last year, we’ve featured on our Instagram page all kinds of photos and videos—including design-related posts…

Take a gander at our favorite 2019 slideshow galleries

From famous celebrity prenups to groundbreaking black lawyers to First Amendment milestones, the ABA Journal presents our favorite slideshow galleries from this year. Which gallery was your favorite?


Afternoon Briefs: SCOTUS won’t review abortion ultrasound law; 9th Circuit edits its Taylor Swift decision

Supreme Court won’t review Kentucky abortion law requiring ultrasounds

The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to hear a challenge to a Kentucky law requiring doctors to display fetal ultrasounds and…

Afternoon Briefs: Alex Kozinski returns as litigator; judge blocks firm’s defamation suit against ex-partner

Alex Kozinski returns to the 9th Circuit on the other side of the bench

After retiring in 2017 amid allegations of sexual misconduct, former Judge Alex Kozinski is returning…

Afternoon Briefs: Judge who won’t perform same-sex marriages gets warning; hemp growers no longer seen as suspicious

Judge gets public warning after claiming religious exemption to performing same-sex weddings

A Texas justice of the peace who refuses to perform same-sex weddings has received a public warning from…

Open Access: SCOTUS will consider whether publishers can copyright annotated state codes

Carl Malamud’s latest battle, with Georgia, is set to go before the U.S. Supreme Court on Dec. 2. It stems from a 2013 move by the nonprofit organization that he founded, Public.Resource.Org, to purchase a set of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, scan it and put it on the web.

Afternoon Briefs: Law firm settles age bias suit; SCOTUS reviews Oracle’s $9B copyright claim

Pryor Cashman settles associate’s age bias suit

Pryor Cashman has settled a lawsuit by an associate who said the firm violated the Age Discrimination in Employment Act when it fired…

Lawyer didn’t lie to judge about grandfather’s death but fudged the date, letter reveals
A lawyer who has filed 2,000 lawsuits for copyright infringement got little sympathy from a judge Wednesday during a court hearing to determine whether he should be jailed for failing to provide proof of his grandfather’s death.
Does adding ‘.com’ to generic name create protectable trademark? Supreme Court to decide
The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to decide whether a generic word can be given trademark protection when it is part of a “.com” domain name.
Afternoon Briefs: Judge bans trick-or-treat warning signs; Johnny Depp settles fee dispute

Federal judge sides with sex offenders in battle over trick-or-treat warning signs

A federal judge in Macon, Georgia, has granted a request by three sex offenders to stop a county…

Afternoon Briefs: Andrew Yang didn’t last long in BigLaw; suit against Taylor Swift revived

Andrew Yang lasted only five months in BigLaw

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang left Davis Polk & Wardwell in 2000 after spending only five months as an associate. He had…

Small claims program for copyright violations? ABA-supported legislation passes US House

The House of Representatives approved earlier this week a measure that would establish a copyright small claims program in the U.S. Copyright Office to address some of the violations of copyright and intellectual property.

Jury finds lawyer doesn’t own skyline photo after he sued for infringement in multiple cases
An Indiana lawyer who has filed multiple infringement suits over use of a skyline photo wasn’t able to prove that he actually owned the picture, federal jurors in Indianapolis ruled last Tuesday.

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