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Question of the Week

Does your boss stick up for you when it matters, or not?

Posted Jul 9, 2014 1:35 PM CDT
By Sarah Mui

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Word got out quickly when Florida Judge John Murphy threatened assistant public defender Andrew Weinstock in his courtroom before asking him to step outside, where Murphy reportedly struck Weinstock. Murphy subsequently took a four-week paid leave of absence and returned to the bench last week—though he is only hearing civil cases, and the incident is still under review by the Florida Judicial Qualifications Commission. Weinstock's boss, public defender Blaise Trettis, did not oppose Murphy's return to the bench. Weinstock then resigned this week in protest.

“As you are aware, I do not agree with your position on Judge Murphy returning to the bench. As such, I hereby tender my resignation, effective immediately,” Weinstock wrote in his resignation letter, the Wall Street Journal Law Blog reported.

So this week, we're wondering: Has there ever been a time that your boss failed to stick up for you when it really mattered to you? Or was there a time when he or she came to your defense when it was very important to you? Share your stories with us in the comments.

Read the answers to last week's question: What do you do when a client doesn’t pay the bill?

Featured answer:

Posted by Kristi Bodin: "I handle civil suits and business and licensing matters. I require a 100 percent retainer for transactional, flat-rate work. I provide detailed, staged estimates to litigation clients and try to keep in touch with them about progress and fees as the case goes on. When I’ve had unpaid balances at the end of a case, I try to discuss arrangements with the client. Failing that, I’ve found it effective to simply send them a bill once a month, or once every three months, more or less in perpetuity. As odd as that seems, I’ve actually had clients come in to pay a bill in full as many as two or three years later. Even after I’ve written off the receivable, I often manage to recover overdue balances with this method."

Do you have an idea for a future question of the week? If so, contact us.

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