Trials & Litigation

Lawyer who complained of 'electronic torture' by 'illegally implanted microchips' still practices


A veteran Florida lawyer complained in a written filing earlier this year that her opposing counsel is subjecting her to “electronic torture” through “illegally implanted microchips.”

However, Janice L. Jennings remains in practice in Florida. And at least one of her clients, required by a federal judge to do so, filed an affidavit last week saying that she still wants Jennings to represent her in an employment discrimination case despite having read court paperwork raising questions about the attorney’s competency, the Tampa Bay Times reports.

At a May 16 hearing, another federal judge questioned Jennings, 55, about her claim that opposing counsel John W. Campbell had unfairly caused her to miss a court date. “You’re saying something is implanted in your brain?” asked a stunned U.S. District Judge Richard A. Lazzara.

“In the area of my left ear,” Jennings replied.

She also confirmed in the hearing her written claim that she believed Campbell had used the device to torture her. Campbell represents the Polk County Commission in two employment discrimination cases brought by Jennings on behalf of her clients.

The newspaper says Jennings has also shown unusual perceptions in a number of other matters dating back more than a decade. The Florida Bar is investigating, but Jennings “is afforded a certain amount of due process before we can affect her ability to practice,” associate director of lawyer regulation Arne Vanstrum told the newspaper.

Meanwhile, concerned about a nine-page filing by Jennings referencing the microchips and calling Campbell a “denigrating” and “disrespectful” bully , Campbell relocated a scheduled deposition to the Polk County Courthouse. Asked by Lazzara why he had done so, Campbell succinctly replied: “Metal detector,” the newspaper reports.

Jennings did not respond to numerous messages from the newspaper seeking comment left over a period of several weeks.

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