ABA Journal

Disability Law

635 ABA Journal Disability Law articles.

Listen to our 10 favorite podcast episodes of 2022

Looking for a new listen? We've picked our favorite 2022 episodes from each of the ABA Journal's three podcasts. And if this whets your appetite, find more than 10 years of past episodes on our podcast page. You can also check out more legal podcasts from our partners at Legal Talk Network.

Longtime disability rights advocate Scott LaBarre dies at 54

Scott LaBarre, a longtime member of the ABA who advocated for the rights of people with disabilities, died on Dec. 10 after a short battle with cancer. He was 54. "Scott was a top lawyer in the disability law area, but he was so much more," ABA President Deborah Enix-Ross told the ABA Journal. "He was a great leader, inspiring, always cheerful and upbeat and loved by all who had the good fortune to know him. He worked tirelessly on behalf of the ABA, making the association a much better organization. He will truly be missed, but his legacy endures."

Top 8 Your Voice columns of 2022

Diversity and inclusion, stress management, mental health and practice management are some of the major areas of focus among legal professionals today. And contributors to the ABA Journal’s Your Voice column certainly brought these concepts front and center in 2022.

Expect litigation over absentee ballots, and expect delays in the vote count, Common Cause warns

Absentee voting is facing a double wallop as the Nov. 8 midterm elections approach. Voting in advance of Election Day has been restricted by new state laws that make it more difficult to obtain and cast absentee ballots. And the validity and counting of some of those ballots are likely to be challenged in litigation.

Weekly Briefs: Cardozo Law will fight junk science with $15M; sheriff convicted for restraint-chair misuse

Cardozo Law will use $15M gift to fight junk science convictions

Yeshiva University’s Cardozo School of Law plans to use a $15 million donation to create a justice clinic that…

Ex-EEOC lawyer is making ‘highly questionable’ assertion about abortion travel benefits, Littler Mendelson says

The former general counsel of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is “misleading and intimidating” employers who provide travel benefits for women traveling to obtain abortions, according to a letter by Littler Mendelson’s Workplace Policy Institute, the law firm’s government affairs arm.

Disability law ‘tester’ can sue hotel, despite no intentions of staying there, 1st Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has ruled that a disabled person has standing to sue a hotel for failing to provide accessibility information, even though she does not intend to stay there.

Lawyer is still entitled to disability benefits for depression linked to law practice, 6th Circuit rules

A former Traverse City, Michigan, personal injury lawyer is entitled to continued monthly payments under his disability insurance policy because of evidence that his recurrent depression makes him unable to work as a trial attorney, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Law prof’s suit against law school alleges race and gender discrimination, family status bias

A federal lawsuit alleging race, gender and disability discrimination was filed Friday against the University of Michigan and its law school by a law professor who is Black and a single mother.

Disability law protects people with gender dysphoria, 4th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that the Americans with Disabilities Act protects people with gender dysphoria, which describes the condition in which a person experiences distress because of a conflict between their biological sex and their gender identity.

Sleepwalking employee who got into next-door colleague’s hotel bed isn’t protected by disability law, 5th Circuit rules

An employee who was fired after sleepwalking into her colleague’s bed in a next-door hotel room is not protected by disability law, a federal appeals court has ruled.

5th Circuit rules against children with disabilities who challenged Texas’ ban on school mask mandates

A federal appeals court on Monday ruled that children with disabilities had no standing to challenge a ban on school mask mandates in Texas because they hadn’t shown that a favorable decision would redress their injuries.

Harvard Law grad loses suit claiming lack of bar exam accommodations nixed her BigLaw career

A federal judge has tossed a lawsuit filed by a New York lawyer who claims that she failed the bar exam on her first two tries because of disability bias by the New York State Board of Law Examiners.

Bar examinees have little success with accommodation requests and say the process is stressful

Andrea Gagliardi has various diagnosed disabilities. She had hoped two recent neuropsychological evaluation reports would support her bar exam accommodation requests. But that didn’t happen.

Private companies in Oregon jails must follow state anti-bias law, top state court rules

The Oregon Supreme Court has ruled that private contractors providing services in the state’s prisons are subject to the state law barring discrimination against those with disabilities.

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