ABA Journal

Disability Law

619 ABA Journal Disability Law articles.

Florida lawyer lied to hundreds of disabled trust clients, SEC says

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is accusing a Florida attorney of defrauding at least 380 clients, most of whom have disabilities and are recipients of Medicaid or Social Security Supplemental Security Income benefits.

Weekly Briefs: Prof gets $400K settlement in pronoun case; panic-attack firing leads to $450K verdict

Prof who refused to use preferred pronouns gets $400K settlement

Shawnee State University in Ohio has agreed to pay philosophy professor Nicholas Meriwether $400,000 and to rescind a written warning…

‘Shameful’ insular cases should be overruled, Gorsuch says, as SCOTUS rules against Puerto Rico resident

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 8-1 Thursday that the United States doesn’t violate the equal protection clause by denying disability benefits to residents of Puerto Rico.

Do digital distractions justify law professors’ prohibitions on laptops?

A first-year student who is autistic has an accommodation to use a laptop for taking notes. He also has 14 years of experience teaching in addition to a PhD in education. He was surprised, therefore, when his criminal law professor, who prohibits technology in the classroom, asked him to sit in the back of her class so his computer would not distract others.

Child, 5, lacked intent for prosecution for alleged attack that sent teacher to hospital, experts say

Florida law provides that anyone suspected of a forcible felony, such as aggravated assault, can be prosecuted—no matter what their age is.

The country has a long way to go with ADA compliance, say 2 civil rights lawyers

Although the Americans with Disabilities Act is decades old, many businesses, including law firms, continue to treat it as a suggestion, rather than federal law, according to Eve Hill and Jason Turkish, two lawyers who represent plaintiffs in disability cases.

Weekly Briefs: Appeals courts rule in lawyer restitution cases; tribes agree to opioid settlement

Ex-BigLaw partner must pay $537M in tax fraud scheme

Paul M. Daugerdas, a former Jenkens & Gilchrist partner, lost an appeal in his tax fraud case before the 2nd U.S.…

Barrett is among 4 justices who would have blocked execution of inmate seeking death by nitrogen hypoxia

An Alabama inmate who sought execution by nitrogen hypoxia was put to death by lethal injection Thursday after the U.S. Supreme Court allowed the execution to proceed.

8th Circuit rules for parents seeking school mask mandates because of their children’s disabilities

A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that an Iowa law banning mask mandates at public schools shouldn’t be read to prevent masks when needed to accommodate children’s disabilities.

August Hieber helps create access to legal services for older LGBT adults

August Hieber created Proud to Thrive, the first program in Chicago specifically designed to provide culturally responsive legal advocacy to LGBT older adults. Hieber recognized this population is less likely to access resources because of past experiences with discrimination and worked with the Center for Disability & Elder Law to host legal clinics and train other legal professionals on how to offer services.

Guardianship battles in the spotlight spark new calls for reform

Guardianship, also called conservatorship, is a term used when state law grants an individual decision-making power over an adult deemed incompetent or a minor child. A court-appointed guardian’s control is often limitless and can include power over their person and/or property.

Weekly Briefs: New charges against lawyer accused of staging his shooting; Christian florist settles

Suspended lawyer Alex Murdaugh faces new charges

Suspended South Carolina lawyer Alex Murdaugh, previously charged in an alleged scheme to have himself killed for insurance money, is facing 27…

DOJ suit claims voting law in Texas harms those who need ballot assistance, seek mail-in ballots

The U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against Texas on Thursday that challenges provisions of its new voting law.

Has COVID-19 made the workplace more accessible for lawyers with disabilities?

Since March 2020, most law firms and legal organizations have adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic by allowing their employees to work remotely and transition to more flexible hours. For some lawyers with disabilities, teleworking has brought significant benefits, including increased access to their clients and colleagues and to more job opportunities.

Judge reprimands Littler Mendelson for ‘baseless legal and factual statements’ in disability bias case

A federal judge in Phoenix has formally reprimanded Littler Mendelson for “baseless legal and factual statements” made in a court document while defending DISH Network in a disability bias case.

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