ABA Journal

Asked and Answered

171 ABA Journal Asked and Answered articles.

As states consider regulation targeting transgender youths, some minds have been changed

A lawyer at the National Center for Lesbian Rights says despite several legislative obstacles, many LGBTQ clients are finding support from churches, neighbors and schools.

Want to be a successful litigator? Come to the office, say 2 BigLaw trial lawyers

For young litigators who want to be considered “a lawyer’s lawyer,” careers spent mostly working from home may not get you to where you want to be, according to two BigLaw partners who have been trying cases for more than 30 years.

The country has a long way to go with ADA compliance, say 2 civil rights lawyers

Although the Americans with Disabilities Act is decades old, many businesses, including law firms, continue to treat it as a suggestion, rather than federal law, according to Eve Hill and Jason Turkish, two lawyers who represent plaintiffs in disability cases.

Control is often an issue in breakups, and COVID-19 made it worse, say 2 family law attorneys

Business hasn’t slowed down during the COVID-19 pandemic, which tore many couples apart, according to two family law attorneys. However, the COVID-19 crisis has made it easier to work together.

Do federal jurors still care whether a witness is caught in a lie? Not as much, say 2 veteran litigators

Physical aspects aren’t the only changes in federal litigation, according to two veteran litigators featured in this month’s Asked and Answered podcast, which is looking at how litigation has changed over the years.

Listen to our 10 favorite podcast episodes of 2021

Looking for a new listen? We've picked our favorite 2021 episodes from each of the ABA Journal's three podcasts. And if this whets your appetite, find more than 10 years of past episodes on our podcast page. You can also check out more legal podcasts from our partners at Legal Talk Network.

3 decades ago, legal headhunting required more time for fewer placements

Two female recruiters are featured in this month’s Asked and Answered podcast, which is looking at how legal recruiting has changed over the years, including an incredibly hot job market for 2021.

When most of law school faculty were straight white men, how did those who were not bring change?

This month’s Asked and Answered podcast looks at how work environments have changed for female law school faculty.

How has practicing in the Supreme Court changed throughout the years?

This month’s Asked and Answered podcast is looking at how advocacy has changed in the country’s highest court. It’s part of a special series on how lawyers’ work has changed over the years.

Following a viral video, Harvard Law School student finds ways to connect remotely

Many Harvard Law School students knew of classmate Rehan Staton through a July 2020 video that went viral, which featured him opening a Harvard Law School acceptance email. There’s a lot more to him than the video, and Staton wanted to connect with classmates more significantly while they attended remote classes over the past year.

For this lawyer, becoming more flexible was a benefit of the pandemic

Lawyer Patrick Krill learned to be more flexible during the pandemic, with inspiration from Be Water, an ESPN documentary about martial artist and actor Bruce Lee.

Saying yes has been part of this law school dean’s strategy during the COVID-19 pandemic

Leadership involves taking in a variety of viewpoints, says law dean Hari Osofsky, and recognizing what students, professors and administration want is a good way to guarantee people that they are being heard.

A year after his COVID-19 recovery, Above the Law founder David Lat makes some big changes

In May 2020, lawyer and author David Lat was starting his recovery from a life-threatening bout with COVID-19. A little over a year later, Lat, founder of Above the Law, decided to leave his job as a legal recruiter, go back to writing full time, and leave New York City for the New Jersey suburbs with his husband and their 3-year-old son. The COVID-19 pandemic influenced those changes.

The pandemic brought this lawyer to legal commentary, and the work includes sponsorship deals

Lawyer and influencer Emily D. Baker thinks YouTube is a great place to teach people how the law works.

The pandemic has not slowed down Howard Bashman of How Appealing

Howard Bashman of How Appealing discusses blogging during COVID-19 and how appellate work in Pennsylvania has changed in the pandemic.

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