ABA Journal

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ABA supports reproductive choice, opposes prosecution for having an abortion, ABA president says

ABA President Reginald Turner emphasized Friday that the American Bar Association “remains committed to doing all it can to support reproductive choice.”



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Supreme Court overrules Roe v. Wade and the right to abortion

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that there is no constitutional right to abortion in an opinion by Justice Samuel Alito—the same justice who wrote the opinion when it was leaked in draft form.



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Miranda violation doesn’t give rise to civil claim for damages, SCOTUS rules

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-3 Thursday that a certified nursing assistant who made an incriminating statement during an interrogation can’t sue the sheriff’s deputy who questioned him without a Miranda warning.



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Lawyer with history of driving while naked gets indefinite suspension

The Ohio Supreme Court indefinitely suspended lawyer Scott Blauvelt on Thursday after he was accused multiple times of driving while nude.



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Supreme Court nears end of term amid conflict and discord

“What we have now is kind of a perfect storm,” says Stefanie Lindquist, a professor of law and political science at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. “The court is sort of rattled by all the political instability that we’re all experiencing writ large.”



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Second Amendment protects right to carry a handgun outside the home, Supreme Court rules

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday struck down New York’s requirement that “proper cause” must be shown to obtain a concealed-carry gun license.



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5th Circuit tosses NAACP suit against Mississippi prosecutor accused of racial bias in jury selection

A federal appeals court has ruled that a local NAACP chapter and four Black plaintiffs have no standing to pursue a lawsuit alleging that a Mississippi prosecutor showed a pattern of racial bias during jury selection.



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How much do new public interest lawyers earn? Despite raises, pay is well below that of law firms, NALP says

Median salaries are growing for lawyers working in civil legal services and public interest organizations, but there are still “sobering distinctions” when compared to law firm pay, according to the National Association for Law Placement.



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Riverfront property owners can’t kayak past neighboring properties, state supreme court rules

Fossil hunters who own property along the Mazon River in Illinois can’t kayak past the homes of other riverfront property owners absent permission, the Illinois Supreme Court ruled last week.



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Federal appeals court tosses injured lawyer's Fourth Amendment claim against ICE agent

An agent with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has qualified immunity from a Fourth Amendment claim in a lawsuit filed by an injured lawyer, a federal appeals court has ruled.



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SCOTUS rules against death row inmate seeking neurological test to show ineffective lawyering

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Tuesday that a federal court can’t order a state to transport a death row inmate to a medical facility for testing without a showing that the information sought would be useful in the prisoner’s habeas case.



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ABA supports several of the Biden administration’s proposed nursing home reforms

Nina Kohn, a professor at the Syracuse University College of Law, has long focused on the intersection of the law and the experiences of older adults, including those who need long-term care. In recent months, she has helped draw attention to three policies that closely align with nursing home reforms the Biden administration announced in February.



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Reed Smith's pro bono report expresses 'grave' concerns about death row inmate's conviction

A lawyer for an Oklahoma inmate plans to seek a stay of execution after Reed Smith released a report on its independent investigation of the case, undertaken pro bono at the request of a bipartisan group of more than 30 state lawmakers.



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Federal judge must reevaluate high school’s ban on T-shirts with gun images, 7th Circuit says

A federal appeals court has ruled that a judge applied the wrong legal standard when he tossed a student’s challenge to his high school’s ban on T-shirts with gun images.



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Part of lawsuit alleging gender discrimination at University of Texas at Austin gets past summary judgment

A federal judge recently ruled that an Equal Pay Act claim filed against the University of Texas at Austin by a female law professor is allowed to go forward.



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Lawyer reprimanded after he used profanities while declaring himself best advocate in courtroom

Updated: A Virginia lawyer has been publicly reprimanded after allegedly using profanities in an email to a probation officer who miscalculated sentencing guidelines for one of his clients.



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Woman who jumped into canal to save dog can't sue under rescue doctrine, top state court rules

A woman who suffered neurological and cognitive injuries after jumping into a canal to save a dog can’t recover damages from its owners under the rescue doctrine, the New Jersey Supreme Court has ruled in a unanimous decision.



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Happy the elephant isn’t a person entitled to freedom from detention, top state court rules

New York’s top court ruled 5-2 Tuesday that an elephant named Happy at the Bronx Zoo in New York City can’t be freed from detention through a writ of habeas corpus.



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SCOTUS rules for US citizen who says return of her child to Italy poses grave risk of harm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that U.S. courts can refuse to return children to their home countries in situations posing a grave risk of harm without considering all measures that could reduce the risk.



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Charter school dress code requiring skirts for girls violates equal protection clause, 4th Circuit rules

An en banc federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that a public charter school in North Carolina violated the equal protection clause when it required girls to wear skirts.



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Texas federal judge proclaims that he doesn't read 5th Circuit opinions before second reversal

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at New Orleans has reversed a federal judge’s refusal to suppress gun evidence a second time after he declared that he doesn’t read 5th Circuit opinions and stuck to his initial decision.



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Uniting for Ukraine draws criticism and praise from resettlement groups

Although some resettlement groups have welcomed President Joe Biden’s streamlined humanitarian parole program for Ukrainians fleeing the war, the initiative also has sparked frustration and claims that other at-risk people are not being offered the same protections.



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Judge's error of law is 'mistake' under rule allowing reopened judgments, Supreme Court rules

A judge’s error of law is a “mistake” within the meaning of the federal rule that allows judgments to be reopened, subject to a one-year statute of limitations, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.



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Sotomayor argues Texas court defied SCOTUS ruling in ineffective counsel case

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear the case of a death row inmate who successfully argued two years ago that he received ineffective assistance of counsel.



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