ABA Journal

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As some jurisdictions consider bar exam alternatives, ABA Legal Ed section again looks at bar pass standard

Language for a controversial law school standard, which states that at least 75% of a law school’s graduates pass a bar within a two-year period, is being examined by the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar—in light of some jurisdictions considering alternative paths to law licensure.



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Ex-deputy attorney general in Virginia sues former colleagues for defamation



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Federal judge temporarily blocks law banning 'woke' workplace training, compares Florida to 'Stranger Things'

A federal judge has blocked provisions in a Florida law that forbid promoting concepts based on race, color, sex or national origin in workplace training and educational materials.



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Supreme Court should uphold Indian Child Welfare Act, ABA says in amicus brief

The ABA has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold the Indian Child Welfare Act, writing in an amicus brief filed Thursday that Congress enacted the statute “under valid constitutional authority and on the basis of an extensive body of evidence and law.”



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Dallas attorney who agreed to launder supposed drug money sentenced to 5 years in prison

A Dallas attorney was sentenced to five years in prison for laundering money that he thought was involved in drug trafficking, federal prosecutors in Texas said Wednesday.



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Florida prosecutor sues governor over suspension, claiming free speech violations

A Florida prosecutor who was suspended for his positions on abortion and transgender medical care has filed a federal lawsuit against Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis.



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Federal judge orders 3 pharmacy chains to pay over $650M for role in opioid epidemic

CVS, Walmart and Walgreens must pay $650.6 million to two Ohio counties after contributing to the opioid epidemic, a federal judge said Wednesday.



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Ex-judges ordered to pay more than $200M to victims of juvenile detention corruption scheme

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered two former Pennsylvania judges who orchestrated the “kids for cash” corruption scandal to pay more than $200 million to hundreds of their victims.



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Justice Amy Coney Barrett hasn’t disappointed conservative supporters—so far

Justice Amy Coney Barrett recently completed her nearly two-term tenure as the U.S. Supreme Court’s junior justice, with new Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson having been sworn in on June 30. Barrett has brought more than just froth and foam to her role on the court. When it comes to her central assignment on the court—deciding cases—Barrett has been a reliable conservative vote.



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DOJ, in work to curb attacks on election workers, charges man for threatening phone call

A Missouri man has been charged for threatening an election official in Maricopa County, Arizona, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.



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Damages awards reach nearly 10-year high in employment cases, new report shows

A total of $1.17 billion in damages were awarded in 1,016 employment cases in 2021, representing the highest amount of damages in nearly a decade, according to a new report released in early August.



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Federal court workers can engage in political expression, DC Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has rejected the restrictions on political activities that had been imposed on judiciary workers.



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Disability law protects people with gender dysphoria, 4th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that the Americans with Disabilities Act protects people with gender dysphoria, which describes the condition in which a person experiences distress because of a conflict between their biological sex and their gender identity.



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Following decades of discourse on nonlawyer legal services, questions of motives continue

As some states consider relaxing ethical rules prohibiting nonlawyers from owning law firms, supporters and opponents of these proposals remain suspicious of one another.



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State supreme court rules against attorney who alleged defamation and forced resignation from firm

A Delaware attorney has lost his appeal in a case involving claims that he was defamed and forced to resign from his law firm.



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Federal judge allows antitrust lawsuit against 17 elite universities to move forward

A federal judge in Chicago on Monday rejected a request by 17 private universities to dismiss claims that they violated antitrust laws by using a shared methodology to assess undergraduate applicants’ financial needs and decrease aid packages.



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Full Congressional Record in searchable format offered on law school's website

Although the U.S. Congressional Record has been in a digital format for some time, a version that can easily be searched is now available on an online platform—offered by the Brigham Young University J. Reuben Clark Law School.



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Advances in legal tech and regulatory innovation explored in new ABA report

The ABA Center for Innovation on Tuesday released its inaugural Innovation Trends Report, which explores developments in the legal services industry by focusing on internal ABA innovation, advances in legal technology and regulatory innovation.



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WikiLeaks founder’s lawyers allege CIA authorized spying on their visits

Lawyers for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange are suing the CIA and former CIA director Mike Pompeo for allegedly recording their conversations and copying data from their electronic devices.



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New York man arrested and charged with assault after attack at courthouse

A man who had previously threatened a federal judge attacked a court security officer in the elevator at the federal courthouse in Central Islip, New York, according to a criminal complaint made public Monday.



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Athletic director’s claims that she was fired for being gay are rejected by 8th Circuit

A federal appeals court has ruled in favor of the University of Minnesota, which faced claims of discrimination after firing an openly gay athletic director in 2014.



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Lawyer faces 5-month suspension for lying about capital contribution to law firm

The founder of an Illinois law firm is facing a five-month suspension for “engaging in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation.”



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2 top state courts issue conflicting rulings over abortion restrictions

The Montana Supreme Court on Aug. 9 upheld a lower court decision that temporarily blocked three separate laws that restrict abortion. Meanwhile, the Idaho Supreme Court declined to stop a near-total abortion ban Friday.



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Judge accused of bullying behavior and demeaning comments gets suspension

The Arkansas Supreme Court has ordered a judge to be suspended without pay after he was accused of making negative comments to unrepresented defendants about their appearance, background, residency and ethnicity.



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