ABA Journal

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ABA Legal Ed council seeks comment on proposed revision to law school admissions test requirement

Should the LSAT stay or go? A suggested revision to remove the requirement for law school entrance exams will be going out for notice and comment, following a Friday vote by the council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar.



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Federal judge strikes down sign law requiring transgender bathroom warnings

A federal judge in Nashville, Tennessee, has struck down a state law requiring businesses to post warning signs if they allow transgender people to use restrooms that match their gender identity.



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Maine will hire its first public defenders to aid struggling indigent defense system

Maine, the last state without public defenders, will soon deploy five of them after Democratic Gov. Janet T. Mills signed a bill earlier this month to create a rural public defenders unit.



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Some trials by SEC administrative judges violate Seventh Amendment right to jury trial, 5th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that administrative trials by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission violate the Seventh Amendment right to a jury trial when civil penalties are sought.



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Starting this fall, many Native American students won’t be charged tuition at University of California law schools

Following news that the University of California system will cover tuition and student services fees for in-state residents who are members of federally recognized tribes, the University of California at Berkeley School of Law announced that it will also cover professional degree supplemental tuition for qualifying students.



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Is there a way back for international law firms in Russia?

With pressure mounting on Western companies after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, some law firms realized they needed to do more than just part ways with clients and decided to wind down operations in the country altogether.



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MyCase acquires immigration legal tech software Docketwise

MyCase, a practice management software company, announced Monday that it had acquired the immigration software Docketwise and integrated the platform into its cloud-based software.



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There's modest improvement in law student perceptions of distance learning, new report finds

Law student satisfaction with online learning increased in the past year, but there are still gaps when compared with in-person classes, including participation, according to a report released Wednesday by Gallup and the AccessLex Institute.



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Federal judge blocks school from disciplining teacher if she outs transgender students to their parents

A federal judge in Kansas City, Kansas, has temporarily blocked a school district from disciplining a teacher who had religious objections to a policy that prevented her from outing transgender students to their parents.



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Judge's COVID-19 protocols violated defendant’s right to a public trial, 9th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court ruled Monday that a defendant’s Sixth Amendment right to a public trial was violated when a trial judge allowed an audio stream but not video access to the proceedings.



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Judge criticizes 'nasty litigation tactics' while sanctioning BigLaw firm

A federal judge in Colorado has sanctioned Seyfarth Shaw and its client for misconduct during the discovery process.



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Stanford Law announces elimination of tuition based on family income

If you attend Stanford Law School and your parents have an annual household income at least 150% below the poverty line, tuition will be eliminated starting next year.



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Gorsuch dissents with liberals when SCOTUS bars immigrant's challenge to alleged factual error

Justice Amy Coney Barrett wrote the majority opinion on Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court denied relief to an immigrant who says an immigration judge ordered him deported based on a factual error regarding his driver’s license application.



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Judge involved in White Castle fracas is suspended after arrest for alleged domestic battery



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Law firm leaders are still mostly white and male, ABA diversity survey says

White male attorneys continue to constitute the highest percentages of equity partners, non-equity partners and associates at law firms, according to an ABA report released Monday.



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Supreme Court sides with Ted Cruz in challenge to a campaign finance restriction



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Top Texas court blocks probe of transgender teen's parents over medical treatment but won't go further

The Texas Supreme Court on Friday blocked child welfare officials from investigating lawsuit plaintiffs who provided medical treatments for their transgender child. But the court refused to go further to protect other parents in similar situations while the case continues.



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Decision to give DC graduates priority access to bar exam supported by local law school deans

Because of seating limitations, Washington, D.C., law school graduates who are first-time test-takers have priority registration for the July 2022 bar exam, the appellate court recently announced, and some deans are not happy about that.



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People younger than age 21 have Second Amendment right to buy semi-automatic rifles, appeals court says

California’s ban on the purchase of semi-automatic rifles by most people younger than age 21 violates their Second Amendment rights, a federal appeals court has ruled.



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Are more law schools needed in areas where InfiLaw campuses closed?

As the Florida Coastal School of Law prepares to close, Jacksonville University announced plans to open a new law school in the same city, with the first entering class starting in fall 2022. Plans are also in place for a new law school at North Carolina’s High Point University, which is about 78 miles from the now-shuttered Charlotte School of Law.



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Lawyer pursued future pain compensation for client who had died, ethics complaint says

A Chicago lawyer sought compensation for “future pain and physical limitations” in settlement negotiations for a client who had already died, according to an ethics complaint.



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Law firm profitability 'dropped markedly' in first quarter amid 12% hike in associate compensation

Law firm profitability decreased in the first quarter of the year, as direct expenses increased 13.1% and overhead increased 9.9% from the same period last year, according to the Thomson Reuters Law Firm Financial Index.



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Texas judge is reprimanded following the shackling of 2 lawyers in courtroom

A Houston family court judge has been publicly reprimanded for ordering two lawyers to be escorted to the jury box by a bailiff who shackled them to a chair while court proceedings continued.



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Technical problems during remote trial violated parent’s due process rights, top state court says

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has ordered a new trial for a mother whose faulty cellphone service caused her to miss much of remote proceeding to terminate her parental rights.



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