ABA Journal

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Examining the Bar: Should law grads need to pass the bar to practice?

The profession often has a hard time with change, and some have said there’s a sense that keeping a bar exam will likely assure people in power that wealthy clients won’t be harmed by admissions alternatives. Nevertheless, lawyers interviewed by the ABA Journal say it’s important that states are even considering changes at all.



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Runaway Sentences: Truck driver's 110-year sentence sparks new focus on mandatory minimums



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How social media hijacked the Depp v. Heard defamation trial

Law firms are wondering what steps they can take to prevent bias like this going forward. And if they can’t prevent it, how can they use social media apps like TikTok in their favor?



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Will mandatory arbitration be banned beyond in workplace sex assault and harassment complaints?

Forced arbitration has long been a controversial practice in the United States. At least one component of forced arbitration, however, has now ended.



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Tulsa Reckoning: An ongoing lawsuit seeks justice for massacre victims

With the clock ticking, the stakes are high. This case could be the “last best hope” for the survivors to see some form of justice before they die. “This massacre impacted Black people around this nation. This is a win that we need as a people.”



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Supreme Court ready to tackle free speech, affirmative action and election law in new term

The U.S. Supreme Court—and those in its orbit—has been going through the usual machinations leading up to a new term in recent weeks: Panels of law professors and practitioners are previewing the big cases of the new term, and a few justices are making public appearances to send one message or another.



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Smith & Wesson is accused of marketing guns to 'disturbed young men' in suit by July 4 victims

Several lawsuits filed Wednesday seek to hold Smith & Wesson accountable for the July 4 mass shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, during a parade.



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Utah’s reforms offer model for serving low-income and indigent people, report suggests

The Utah model of reform allowing nonlawyers to offer legal services could be “critical” to serving people who can’t afford them, according to a Stanford Law School study published Tuesday.



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Lawyer who says student-loan forgiveness leaves him worse off sues to block program

Updated: An Indiana lawyer who will have part of his student debt forgiven through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program has filed a lawsuit challenging student-debt cancellation by the Biden administration.



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Working remotely is now a top priority, says new ABA report highlighting lasting shifts in practice of law

Young lawyers feel so strongly about remote work that 44% of them would leave their current jobs for a greater ability to work remotely elsewhere, according to a new report the ABA released Wednesday.



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California's ban on private immigration detention facilities violates supremacy clause, 9th Circuit rules

An en banc federal appeals court ruled Monday that California’s ban on private detention facilities is unconstitutional when applied to facilities used to detain immigrants.



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Suspension ordered for lawyer accused of sending 'abusive and aggressive' emails

The Illinois Supreme Court has ordered the suspension of a Chicago lawyer for sending harassing and threatening emails deemed to be “abusive and aggressive” by a disciplinary hearing board.



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Court can't compel examination of juror's electronic devices to look for misconduct, 6th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has ruled that a district court has no power to order an examination of a juror’s electronic devices to determine whether an outside influence affected the verdict.



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What is a writ of replevin? It's being used by the DOJ against former White House adviser

Updated: Writs of replevin have been used by creditors to recover collateral, such as cars; by tenants or landlords to recover property taken by the other; by businesses to recover items taken by employees; and by people seeking the return of pets after a breakup. It’s also being cited by the U.S. Department of Justice in a lawsuit against a former senior White House adviser.



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Picture is 'generally bullish' for midsize law firms, new report says

Growth in demand for legal services is greater, on average, for midsize law firms than for the nation’s 100 top-grossing firms, according to a new report by the Thomson Reuters Institute.



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Black defendants make up more than 50% of exonerations since 1989, new report says

People who are Black comprise 13.6% of the population in the United States but 53% of exonerations from the past 33 years, according to a new report released Tuesday by the National Registry of Exonerations. The report shows Black people are overrepresented among exonerations for all serious crimes except white-collar crimes.



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Former BigLaw associate is accused of lying about time spent on document review project

A former Dentons associate is accused in an ethics complaint of falsely claiming that he spent 277 hours to review 425 documents for a client responding to a discovery request.



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After Trump makes claims about planted and declassified documents, special master seeks specifics

The special master reviewing documents seized by the FBI from the Mar-a-Lago home of former President Donald Trump wants both sides to state whether the inventory of items seized is complete and accurate.



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Town justice who brandished gun at defendant should be ousted, judicial conduct commission says

A town and village justice in Whitehall, New York, should be removed from office for brandishing or pointing a handgun at a defendant and then apparently bragging about it in racial terms, according to the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct.



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Former law school dean sues Texas university over loss of tenure

Alleging that she was stripped of tenure without cause and denied due process, the former law school dean of Texas Southern University’s Thurgood Marshall School of Law has brought a federal lawsuit against the historically Black college.



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Overcoming 'arbitrary application of licensing rules,' lawyer wins bar admission in Tennessee

A foreign-educated lawyer with an LLM from a U.S. university has won admission to practice in Tennessee, thanks to a ruling by the state supreme court.



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Classified documents seized from Trump can be used now in criminal investigation, 11th Circuit rules

Updated: The U.S. Department of Justice has succeeded in obtaining a partial stay of a ruling by U.S. District Judge Aileen M. Cannon of the Southern District of Florida in litigation over documents seized from former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago residence in Palm Beach, Florida.



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Strip search by transgender guard violated inmate's religious rights, 7th Circuit says

A federal appeals court ruled Friday for a Muslim inmate in Wisconsin who claimed that his religious rights were violated by strip searches conducted by a transgender prison guard.



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Trump inflated net worth by billions to get favorable loans, obtaining $250M in benefits, NY attorney general says

Former President Donald Trump obtained hundreds of millions of dollars in real estate loans and favorable insurance coverage based on financial statements that inflated his net worth by billions of dollars, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday by the New York attorney general.



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