ABA Journal

Podcasts

Book cover of Change from Within

The Modern Law Library

Can change really come from within? These 13 prosecutors think so

Miriam Aroni Krinsky worked as a prosecutor in Los Angeles County in the 1980s and 1990s as the war on drugs was waged. Mandatory minimum sentences and tough-on-crime laws sent prison populations soaring and ripped apart families and communities. Krinsky thought that change was needed—and that it could come from prosecutors.

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Asked and Answered

Worried about the 2023 lawyer jobs market? This legal search consultant has some tips

While 2022 was a phenomenal year for attorneys and “anyone with a pulse” and a law license could find work, 2023 might “go back to normal,” says Valerie A. Fontaine, a founding director of the legal search company SeltzerFontaine.

The Modern Law Library

‘By Hands Now Known’ shines light on cold cases of lynchings and racial violence

In summer 2020, when the murder of George Floyd was igniting protests in Minneapolis and around the country, it occurred to Margaret A. Burnham that "George Floyd" was a common-sounding name. Burnham is the founder and director of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project at the Northeastern University School of Law, where she is also a professor.

Legal Rebels Podcast

It’s a long road ahead for driverless cars, says Fastcase executive

Four years ago, Damien Riehl, like many others, was quite bullish about the future of autonomous vehicles. The potential of the technology was obvious: No more worrying about someone trying to text and drive, no more need for drunken driving checkpoints, and no more danger of falling asleep at the wheel.

Asked and Answered

Stressed about holiday parties? Think about skipping them, says lawyer in recovery

As we head into the holiday season, consider what you want your celebrations to look like, rather than meeting everyone else’s expectations, says Laurie Besden, a lawyer who has been sober for almost two decades.

The Modern Law Library

How do you calculate damages in injury trials? Longtime expert witness reveals methodology

For any plaintiff who's been injured or any young attorney just starting out in the field of tort law, it can be daunting to calculate what monetary damages—and nonmonetary damages such as pain and suffering—they should be asking for if they win a civil trial or are evaluating a settlement offer. Estimating what the future would have looked like if an accident had never occurred can seem more like a thought experiment than a scientific process.

Legal Rebels Podcast

How lawyers can unlock the potential of the metaverse

The metaverse is all the rage these days. Users can enter a virtual world where they can interact with people from all parts of the physical world, play games, engage in commerce and do a lot of other things. Think Ready Player One, or for older folks, think The Matrix movies, Total Recall or even Disclosure.

The Modern Law Library

Author and lawyer Scott Turow made generational leap for new legal thriller

Author and lawyer Scott Turow’s latest legal thriller Suspect reintroduces readers to Clarice “Pinky” Granum, the granddaughter of attorney Sandy Stern—a character from the author's novels The Last Trial and his blockbuster debut Presumed Innocent.

Asked and Answered

Employment outcomes were great for 2021 law school graduates; is that a sign of caution?

The overall employment outcomes for 2007 and 2021 law school graduates were both 91.9%, according to data recently released by the National Association for Law Placement. And while that sounds like a good thing, it could be a warning, says Aaron Taylor, executive director of AccessLex’s Center for Legal Education Excellence.

The Modern Law Library

Nina Totenberg’s early life, NPR legacy and friendship with the Notorious RBG

In this special two-part episode of the Modern Law Library, Lee Rawles speaks with Lisa Napoli, author of Susan, Linda, Nina & Cokie: The Extraordinary Story of the Founding Mothers of NPR, and we hear from Nina Totenberg about her new book, Dinners With Ruth: A Memoir on the Power of Friendships.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Legal Chatbots: What can and can’t they do?

The next time you go to a website, find the customer service tab and enter a live chatroom with an assistant tasked with answering your questions and helping you with your issues, the chances are that you’re not actually talking to a human.

The Modern Law Library

9th Circuit judge shines light on Justice William O. Douglas’ environmental campaigns

Asked and Answered

Lawyer who moved from Ukraine to US now has opportunity to help others facing similar situations

Ellen Freeman immigrated from Odesa, Ukraine, to Pittsburgh almost 30 years ago. And although her family always planned to leave—she grew up learning various languages so that she could communicate wherever they settled—moving to the United States as a young single mother was one of the most difficult things that she has ever done.

The Modern Law Library

Sick of meetings that go off the rails? ‘Robert’s Rules of Order’ can help

It's no secret that lawyers are asked to attend or preside over many kinds and types of meetings. From attending a professional association's annual meeting with hundreds of fellow attorneys (as the ABA just had in August) to being asked to chair a nonprofit board or preside at a homeowners association meeting, lawyers are often looked to for guidance.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Why this BigLaw firm adopted a permanent work-from-anywhere policy for its lawyers and staff

Thanks to nearly two-years of COVID-19-related shutdowns and sheltering-in-place orders, working from home has become the new normal. Face-to-face interactions have been replaced by meeting on real-time videoconferencing platforms such as Zoom, FaceTime or Microsoft Teams, while cloud-based collaborative programs have become absolutely vital if any work is to be done.

The Modern Law Library

Summer pop culture picks and what else we lost when Roe was overturned

It's time for the Modern Law Library's summer recommendations episode, in which host Lee Rawles shares her pop culture picks with you, plus a re-airing of one of our older episodes that has become relevant again.

The Modern Law Library

After collaborating with bestselling author, judge discusses new solo book

After several collaborations with bestselling author James Patterson, Judge David Ellis of Illinois, a prolific novelist, decided to go it alone for his latest book, Look Closer.

Asked and Answered

Following her experiences, former law clerk seeks support for the Judiciary Accountability Act

Aliza Shatzman didn’t realize that federal judicial employees are not protected by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. That is until the judge she worked for in 2020 ended her clerkship early—for reasons that she thinks were due to gender discrimination.

Legal Rebels Podcast

How technology can improve immigration policy and practice

The U.S. immigration system is complex and confusing, and it causes no shortage of stress for those who have to go through it.

The Modern Law Library

The modern US Border Patrol is a national police force with dangerous capabilities, author warns

In Nobody is Protected: How the Border Patrol Became the Most Dangerous Police Force in the United States, geographer Reece Jones argues that Supreme Court precedent, a growing workforce and mission creep have made the U.S. Border Patrol a national police force that operates without appropriate accountability.

The Modern Law Library

Authors of ‘50 Lessons for Happy Lawyers’ share some top tips

Even during times less tumultuous than the one we are in now, lawyers as a profession report high levels of stress. Finding the way to keep motivated and healthy on an individual level while fighting systemic problems is no easy task. It was this challenge that lawyers Nora Riva Bergman and Chelsy A. Castro set out to address in their new book, 50 Lessons for Happy Lawyers.

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