Podcasts

remote working concept

Asked and Answered

How to practice law remotely and efficiently during the COVID-19 crisis

As people across the country are coping with countless changes in light of the novel coronavirus pandemic, the ABA Journal’s Asked and Answered podcast is taking a break from its regularly scheduled programing to share information with lawyers about how they can adjust to the world’s current situation—such as having to work from home, whether they want to or not.

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Asked and Answered

Amped Up: ADHD med abuse in the legal profession

The Modern Law Library

Public speaking skills every lawyer should master

For every lawyer who thinks they have oral presentations down pat, there’s another who has anxiety about talking in front of a crowd. And they both need help.

Asked and Answered

How can Americans get the civic literacy they need for a functioning democracy?

Legal Rebels Podcast

David Van Zandt has made a career out of touching third rails in higher education

When David Van Zandt became dean of what is now Northwestern University's Pritzker School of Law in 1995, he faced a steep learning curve. Up until then, he had never managed an organization of more than a few people.

The Modern Law Library

The strange tale of the ‘Voodoo reverend’ and Harper Lee’s lost true-crime book

Asked and Answered

What will be the hot careers for the Class of 2019?

Practice areas like cannabis law, M&A and real estate law are currently hot, but the good times never last forever, says legal recruiting consultant Valerie Fontaine of SeltzerFontaine.

The Modern Law Library

Why tech tools can have promise and peril for policing

Like everyone else, police are inundated with new gadgets and technologies promised to make their jobs easier. But do they? In his new book, Thin Blue Lie, investigative journalist Matt Stroud digs deeps into the background of various police technologies' promises and perils.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Nonprofit law pioneer applauds ‘low bono’ growth

Before they were buzzwords, Luz Herrera was a pioneer in the world of "low bono" practice, nonprofit law firms and legal incubators. All three innovations have blossomed and spread across the country since then.

The Modern Law Library

How introverts can make networking work for them

Asked and Answered

Your client’s gone viral—now what?

Drawing attention to a client's plight can be a great outcome for an attorney wanting justice in a case. But what do you do when your client is trending on Twitter for all the wrong reasons?

The Modern Law Library

Did an ax murderer go free? ‘The Trial of Lizzie Borden’ examines the evidence

Legal Rebels Podcast

Not content with retirement, Jeff Carr continues the fight against billable hours

The Modern Law Library

Former JAG Corps captain draws from history and sports for diversity advice

Kenneth Imo spent years playing college football for Southern Methodist University, working his way up in the U.S. Air Force and leading the charge for diversity in two international law firms. Imo mined his experiences for his book, Fix It: How History, Sports, and Education Can Inform Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity Today.

Asked and Answered

Bullying from the bench: How to cope in court

When attorney Roula Allouch got involved with Bullyproof, an anti-bullying initiative with the ABA Young Lawyers Division, she quickly saw that many members’ complaints were about judges.

The Modern Law Library

From Columbine to Parkland: How have school shootings changed us?

The 10 years that Dave Cullen spent researching and reporting on the 1999 shootings in Littleton, Colorado, for his book Columbine were so draining that he experienced secondary PTSD. So on Feb. 14, 2018, when he heard about the shootings at Margery Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, he had no initial intention of writing about them. But in the nearly 20 years since the Columbine shootings changed our expectations about school safety, there had been a number of changes—including what the children directly impacted were able to do to change our national conversations about gun laws.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Leading advocate for diversity in legal industry hasn’t seen much progress in 10 years

In the 10 years since Emery K. Harlan, co-founder of the National Association of Minority & Women Owned Law Firms, was featured as an ABA Journal Legal Rebel, he says little has changed for diversity in the profession.

The Modern Law Library

Building blockchain expertise into a practice that pays

Blockchain's a buzzword, but what does it mean? In this episode of the Modern Law Library, our guests James A. Cox and Mark W. Rasmussen give a breakdown of what blockchain is, the emerging legal issues the technology is prompting, and why Jones Day thinks that it's an important emerging practice area.

Asked and Answered

Finding the right fit: Creating a career you love

Samorn Selim had a difficult childhood. Her family fled Laos when she was young, and settled in a rough section of Stockton, California. There was violence in her neighborhood, and sometimes the family did not have enough food.

The Modern Law Library

Supreme Court’s history with alcohol gets a look in ‘Glass and Gavel’

From the earliest days of the U.S. Supreme Court, alcohol has been part of the work lives and social lives of the justices. In the book Glass and Gavel: The U.S. Supreme Court and Alcohol, Nancy Maveety takes readers on a tour through the ways that SCOTUS and spirits have overlapped.

Legal Rebels Podcast

From consulting to politics, former Orrick CEO continues to beat the drum for change

When Ralph Baxter joined the inaugural class of Legal Rebels in 2009, he was the CEO and chairman of Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe. Just a year into the biggest recession since the Great Depression, he caught the ABA Journal’s attention through his initiatives that took Orrick from a domestic, California-based firm to an international heavyweight while navigating economic turbulence.

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