11th Circuit Court

586 ABA Journal 11th Circuit Court articles.

Supreme Court will decide circuit split over Facebook’s use of text messages
The U.S. Supreme Court granted Facebook Inc.’s request Thursday to review a proposed class action that accuses the social media company of sending unwanted text messages.
SCOTUS will consider free speech damages in case of evangelizing college student
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed on Thursday to decide whether an evangelizing college student may receive nominal damages from a state college for an alleged free speech violation that happened under a policy that has since been discarded.
Afternoon briefs: TRO lifted against Mary Trump publisher; Jeffrey Epstein associate arrested

Appeals court lifts TRO against Mary Trump publisher

A New York appeals court on Wednesday lifted a temporary restraining order that blocked Simon & Schuster from publishing a tell-all book…

Afternoon Briefs: Judicial council halts statewide COVID-19 bail schedule; Amazon pauses police use of facial recognition tech

California ends statewide bail policy enacted to stop COVID-19 spread in jails

The California Judicial Council voted Wednesday to end a statewide emergency bail schedule enacted in early April in…

Lawyer’s convictions upheld for role in schemes to con law firms and users of dating websites
A federal appeals court has upheld a Texas lawyer’s conspiracy convictions for his role in schemes to con law firms, job seekers and users of dating websites.
Federal judge rules Florida can’t require payment of fees before ex-felons can vote
A federal judge ruled Sunday that it is unconstitutional in some circumstances for Florida to require felons who have completed their sentences to pay legal financial obligations before being allowed to vote.
SCOTUS will decide whether computer fraud law applies to cop’s unauthorized database search
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act applies to a police officer’s unauthorized search of a license place database.
Afternoon Briefs: First black female Harvard Law grad dies from COVID-19; food delivery apps face antitrust suit

First black female Harvard Law grad dies from novel coronavirus

The first black woman to graduate from Harvard Law School has died after contracting COVID-19. Lila Fenwick graduated from the…

Afternoon Briefs: Seyfarth withdraws after controversial filing; law firm scammer seeks release

Seyfarth Shaw withdraws from suit after controversial argument

Seyfarth Shaw is seeking to withdraw from representing the U.S. Soccer Federation in an equal-pay case after a controversial court filing.…

Ex-felons in Florida who can’t afford fees and fines are entitled to vote, 11th Circuit says
Ex-felons in Florida who can’t afford to pay outstanding fees and fines are entitled to vote under a state constitutional amendment restoring voting rights, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday.
Afternoon Briefs: SCOTUS lacks State of the Union majority; judge reverses No More Deaths convictions

Which Supreme Court justices attended the State of the Union?

Only four justices attended the State of the Union on Tuesday. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. was there, even…

11th Circuit upholds dismissal of juror who said Holy Spirit told him to acquit former congresswoman
A federal judge didn’t err when he dismissed a juror who declared that the Holy Spirit told him a former congresswoman was innocent in an alleged charity scam, a federal appeals court has ruled in a 2-1 decision.
Tech company accused of bar-exam grading glitch has no liability in test-takers’ suit, 11th Circuit says
Law grads who were wrongly told that they failed the Georgia bar exam can’t recover damages against the software company they accused of producing the incorrect scores, a federal appeals court has ruled.
Chemerinsky: 2019 was all about setting up the blockbuster year 2020 promises to be
The past year was unusual in the U.S. Supreme Court because the justices handed down only a few blockbuster decisions but then filled their docket with a stunning number of cases of potentially great significance to be decided in spring 2020. Interestingly, the court could have taken many of these cases in the October 2018 term for decisions in June 2019, but it did not do so.
Judge’s clerk performs behind-the-back cellphone dial to test plaintiff’s claim
Was it possible for a suspect handcuffed with his hands behind him in a patrol car to reach his cellphone and make a call to his aunt? That’s one of the facts in dispute in the case of Omar Alston, who contends that he made the call shortly before a sheriff’s deputy pulled him out of a police vehicle in June 2011 and exposed Alston’s genitals during a search.

Read more ...




Web First
How the Washington Supreme Court's LLLT program met its demise
Original reporting ...
Topics: Career & Practice
Dorsey & Whitney isn't liable for blog post about lawyer, 2nd Circuit rules
Complete list of topics ...


Your Voice
Why Generation Z isn't the feared 'zombie' generation
Articles and commentary ...
Podcasts
COVID-19 hasn't stopped this lawyer from advocating for wellness and recovery
More podcasts ...