9th Circuit Court

1287 ABA Journal 9th Circuit Court articles.

Does ban on encouraging illegal immigration violate First Amendment? SCOTUS to decide
The U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a 1986 law making it a crime to encourage unauthorized immigration is an unconstitutional infringement on free speech.
Judge blocks 4 federal executions, rules DOJ protocol doesn’t follow law

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., has halted the Department of Justice’s plans to resume executions after a 16-year hiatus. District Judge Tanya Chutkan issued a preliminary injunction Wednesday. She ruled on behalf of four federal death-row inmates.

SCOTUS ranks dead last for transparency on Fix the Court list; how did other courts fare?
The U.S. Supreme Court is the least transparent among federal appellate-level courts, while the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at San Francisco is No. 1 for public access, according to Fix the Court, a national nonpartisan organization based in New York City.
ABA committee gives ‘not qualified’ rating to 9th Circuit nominee said to have ‘entitlement temperament’
Federal appeals court nominee Lawrence VanDyke is experienced and "clearly smart," but his accomplishments are offset by negative qualities that emerged in a review of his professional qualifications, according to a letter by the ABA Standing Committee on the Federal Judiciary.
Law firms settle suit accusing them of civil RICO conspiracy to collect ADA settlements
Two California law firms have resolved a lawsuit accusing them of engaging in a civil RICO conspiracy by filing multiple lawsuits against small businesses for alleged violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
SCOTUS rejects pizza delivery company’s appeal over web and mobile app accessibility
The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to hear Domino’s Pizza Inc.’s appeal over its website and mobile app and whether they are required to comply with federal disabilities law.
Chemerinsky: Weighty matters load the Supreme Court’s next term
The U.S. Supreme Court justices return from their summer recess Monday to a calendar filled with potential blockbuster cases. Typically, about half the docket is set before the justices’ recess at the end of June, with the remaining cases taken between the beginning of October and the middle of January. But just based on what already is on the docket, this term could be filled with cases of great significance.
Why scraping publicly available information online isn’t a crime

To criminalize public website scraping castrates an open internet by curtailing access to information, says ABA Journal Legal Affairs Writer Jason Tashea. This isn’t just an issue for internet startups and academic researchers but also the legal community.

Supreme Court says US can implement rule that bans most asylum applications at southern border
The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday evening allowed a Trump administration rule to take effect that effectively bans asylum applications by most immigrants at the southern border.
Afternoon Briefs: New win for flag burner in SCOTUS case; Johnson & Johnson seeks mistrial for stricken closing

News Roundup

Ban on political robocalls violates First Amendment, 9th Circuit rules
A Montana law that bans political robocalls is a content-based restriction that violates the First Amendment, a federal appeals court has ruled.
Afternoon Briefs: Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers speak; judge gives assignment for veteran lies

Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers speak at unusual hearing

For more than an hour on Tuesday, women who accused financier Jeffrey Epstein of sexually abusing them when they were young spoke about…

9th Circuit rules for noncitizen drug trafficker who claimed violation of his statutory right to a lawyer
Noncitizens subject to expedited removal have a statutory right to a lawyer, at their own expense, in proceedings before immigration judges to determine whether they have a reasonable fear of persecution in their home country, a federal appeals court has ruled.
Afternoon Briefs: Former judge pleads guilty to murder; parents sue over Sharpie haircut punishment

Former judge pleads guilty to murder of his ex-wife

Former Ohio judge Lance Mason pleaded guilty Tuesday to fatally stabbing his ex-wife, Aisha Fraser, in November. Mason had resigned his…

As federal anti-hacking law turns 35, its meaning, reach and effectiveness are still murky

What had started as a pre-internet computer crime law affecting national security and finance has become a statute that prosecutors, plaintiff attorneys and defense counsels agree isn’t right for its time, and maybe never was. Even with broad agreement on the problem, however, the solution is less clear.

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