ABA Journal

Administrative Law

1149 ABA Journal Administrative Law articles.

Federal appeals court strikes down ATF rule banning rapid-fire bump stocks

Updated: The en banc 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at New Orleans has struck down a Trump administration ban on bump stocks, which are used to accelerate gunfire on semi-automatic weapons.

Judge ruled on traffic citations before hearing date to cover for planned absence, ethics complaint alleges

A municipal judge in Philadelphia is accused of trying to cover for her upcoming absence by ruling on traffic citations before the scheduled hearing date, marking some ticketed people as “guilty in absentia.”

Chief justice temporarily continues Title 42 policy that expelled asylum-seekers based on COVID-19 dangers

Chief Justice John Roberts on Monday temporarily kept in place a policy that quickly turned back asylum-seekers on the ground that they could contribute to the spread of COVID-19.

Supreme Court will consider challenge to Biden’s student-debt relief program, puts case on fast track

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide a challenge to the Biden administration’s student-debt relief program in a lawsuit filed by six states.

Small law firms have reason for ‘cautious optimism,’ new Thomson Reuters report says

Despite concerns about an economic downturn, many small law firms are bullish about their prospects and expect moderate-to-high growth in the next three years, according to a report published Thursday.

2 Trump appointees battle as 9th Circuit upholds chalking tires; dissent accused of analysis by ‘hyperbole’

Two judges appointed by former President Donald Trump sparred Wednesday on whether a city violates the Fourth Amendment by chalking tires without a warrant to enforce parking time limits.

Justice Thomas gives Sen. Lindsey Graham temporary reprieve on testifying before grand jury

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas on Monday stayed an order that required Republican U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina to testify before a grand jury investigating 2020 election interference.

8th Circuit temporarily pauses student-loan forgiveness program

The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at St. Louis on Friday granted an administrative stay that temporarily pauses the Biden administration’s student-loan debt-relief program.

Weekly Briefs: Judge tosses challenge to ‘Don’t Say Gay’ law; gun-makers win dismissal of Mexico suit

Challenge to Florida’s ‘Don’t Say Gay’ law gets tossed

A federal judge in Tallahassee, Florida, has tossed a challenge to Florida’s Parental Rights in Education law, which critics have…

Lawyer who says student-loan forgiveness leaves him worse off sues to block program

Updated: An Indiana lawyer who will have part of his student debt forgiven through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program has filed a lawsuit challenging student-debt cancellation by the Biden administration.

At least one high-level administrator at a law firm makes $2.7M, survey says

Top-level administrative professionals in law firms make anywhere from $77,000 to $2.7 million in total compensation, according to a recently released survey.

Texas judge is ordered to be recused from dozens of cases amid bias allegations

A district judge in Dallas County, Texas, who presides in felony cases has been ordered to be recused from dozens of cases based on requests by 13 criminal defense lawyers.

Federal judge blocks guidance on bathroom, locker room access for transgender students and employees

A federal judge in Tennessee has blocked guidance that says federal bans on sex discrimination protect transgender students and employees who want to use bathrooms and locker rooms and play on sports teams that correspond with their gender identity.

Retired Supreme Court Justice Breyer to head ABA ROLI board

Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer will become the next chair of the Rule of Law Initiative Board, the ABA announced Friday. ROLI’s current portfolio includes work in more than 50 countries.

Biden administration can’t require emergency abortions, Texas lawsuit says

The state of Texas is challenging Biden administration guidance that says emergency rooms that receive Medicare funds must provide abortions. If a pregnant patient is experiencing a medical emergency as defined by the law, and abortion is a stabilizing treatment that would resolve the condition, the abortion must be provided, according to U.S. Department of Health & Human Services guidance.

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