ABA Journal

Columns

153 ABA Journal Columns articles.

How to make better decisions with litigation analytics software

If you’re a litigator, you know that knowledge is power. The more you know about the court, opposing counsel, expert witnesses, the parties and the judge, the better. This is because more information allows you to make sound, informed decisions to help you achieve a successful end result for your client.

Law firms must do more effective damage control to survive

When I sat down to write this column, my thoughts were interrupted by a mechanical noise coming from my backyard. It was the comforting sound of the weekly “test run” of the generator that keeps our house powered during electrical outages.

Investment bank managing director discusses legal tech market and lasting impacts of COVID-19

Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Scott Mozarsky, a managing director with the Jordan, Edmiston Group Inc., a middle-market investment bank, where he leads its legal and compliance practice.

Is the law making you fat?  A lawyer and life coach shares her story

Law school taught me many things, but one that stands out for me is this: Chocolate cake reduces stress.

For minority law students, learning the law can be intellectually violent

It pales in comparison to the structural and physical violence that people experience outside the ivory tower, but it is also unforgiving, can feel unrelenting and often goes unnamed.

Should juries be feared or revered? Retired lawyer examines their roles

The jury system first scared me at the age of 9. How, you ask? I grew up in Montreal, the son of parents who immigrated from Belgium. My late father was a humble tailor who worked in a factory. One day, we received a letter in the mail. It had an impressive-looking logo of a crown and the scales of justice.

Thanks for nothing: When should lawyers end an email with ‘thank you’?

Writing a professional email is difficult enough. And choosing an appropriate signoff can be daunting, with so many options to choose from: “Thank you” (or just “Thanks”), “Sincerely,” “Best,” “Regards,” “Yours” or nothing at all (as in, “—Jon”). The list goes on.

‘On the Basis of Sex’ and remembering Justice Ginsburg

R.I.P., RBG. Here we are again, almost four years from the last time a U.S. Supreme Court Justice died in office. Justice Antonin Scalia passed away in February of 2016, and President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland for the vacant position. We all know how that turned out.

‘CSI effect’ remains a myth, retired judge says on 20th anniversary of popular forensic science show

However, Donald Shelton is quick to make clear that the perception of a “CSI effect,” plus ever-evolving technology and social media, are altering the manner in which juries hear and decide cases.

The psychological obstacles to achieving diversity in the legal profession

Last year, I wrote that the legal profession’s failure to retain women and minorities was not a “hard problem,” but rather a character flaw. My intent was not to imply malice; many partners at law firms genuinely want their diversity numbers to improve. Still, facts are facts.

Chemerinsky: The Supreme Court returns to a term like no other

No other first Monday in October, the traditional start of a new U.S. Supreme Court term, ever has been like this one. With the country still in the midst of a pandemic, oral arguments will be held by telephone as they were in May. The justices and the country are still reeling from the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Sept. 18. Looming large is the coming confirmation battle over the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, who would add another staunch conservative to the court.

Do you use ‘good English’? Test your grammatical skills with this 20-question quiz

Let’s try a 20-question quiz. The object is to select the choice that writers, editors and book publishers have overwhelmingly used over the past several decades. We’re assessing your knack for standard written English. We’re testing your feel for plurals, possessives and subject-verb agreement. These are grammatical issues, not word-choice issues. See how you fare.

How contract review software can save your law firm time and money

This type of software is grounded in machine learning and natural language processing, and it assists lawyers in analyzing contracts for their clients more effectively and efficiently, saving tons of time and money, writes lawyer and author Nicole Black.

How to empower working moms during the coronavirus pandemic

Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Carolyn Elefant, an attorney who focuses her practice on energy and environmental matters and the author of several books, including Solo by Choice: How to Be the Lawyer You Always Wanted to Be.

What I learned from Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Last week, we lost a giant—a giant who stood just a little more than 5 feet tall and who made the world a better place for all of us. She will be remembered for many of the legal theories and opinions she espoused during her 27 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, but more than anything else, she will be remembered for the critical role she played in advancing equality for women.

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