ABA Journal

Election Law

932 ABA Journal Election Law articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Toobin returns to CNN after Zoom exposure; DOJ inspector general will review leak subpoenas

Jeffrey Toobin returns to CNN after Zoom incident

Journalist and legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin has returned to CNN eight months after he masturbated during a break in a Zoom…

Texas attorney general faces ethics probe over election suit; former AG Barr fares better in DC

Asked to probe two high-profile officials, disciplinary authorities in Texas and Washington, D.C., took different tacks.

BigLaw partner leaves firm after he sues voting machine companies for MyPillow CEO

Barnes & Thornburg partner Alec Beck has left the law firm after filing a lawsuit on behalf of MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell alleging that voting machine companies are “weaponizing the litigation process to silence political dissent.”

Afternoon Briefs: MLB faces federal lawsuit for moving All-Star Game; entertainment lawyer starts singing career at 92

Atlanta business group sues MLB for moving All-Star Game

Job Creators Network, a conservative organization that represents small businesses, is suing Major League Baseball for moving the July All-Star Game…

This voting rights advocate and ‘Jeopardy!’ champ is ready with the right answers

In addition to appearing on Jeopardy! last year, Zach Newkirk was involved with a lawsuit against then-President Donald Trump on behalf of those injured during the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests in Lafayette Square.

Afternoon Briefs: DOJ will probe Louisville, Kentucky, police; Coca-Cola reviews outside counsel diversity policy

DOJ will investigate Louisville, Kentucky, police practices

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland announced Monday that the Department of Justice is investigating whether the Louisville, Kentucky, Metro Police Department uses unreasonable…

Leaders of 62 BigLaw firms denounce voting restrictions; coalition is formed to challenge legislation

Law firms are getting involved in the controversy over voting restrictions, already passed in Georgia and under consideration in Texas.

Afternoon Briefs: Supreme Court rules for religion; Ramsey Clark dies at 93

SCOTUS blocks restrictions on religious meetings at homes during pandemic

The U.S. Supreme Court blocked California’s restrictions on religious meetings at homes during the COVID-19 crisis in a 5-4 vote…

Afternoon Briefs: Slower-paying law students wait-listed; ‘tiger mom’ law prof back in the news

Law school wait-lists students who finished late in deposit race

The University of Notre Dame’s law school is facing criticism for putting pressure on would-be law students to make their…

Breyer says expanding Supreme Court could erode trust, proponents should ‘think long and hard’

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer said Tuesday proponents of expanding or changing the structure of the U.S. Supreme Court should “think long and hard before embodying those changes in law.”

What is a lawyer’s ethical duty to check out a client’s claim before filing an action?

When a lawyer files an action based on an unfounded legal theory, he or she could be subject to sanctions or disciplinary action ranging up to disbarment. Experts say lawyers have a duty to investigate whether their clients’ accusations have support or are without merit.

Afternoon Briefs: Georgia voting restrictions challenged; judge charged with terroristic threats

News Roundup

Election lawyer sanctioned $10K; judge says she ‘bamboozled’ voters who didn’t realize they were plaintiffs

A Minnesota judge said Friday he would impose a $10,000 sanction on an election lawyer who “bamboozled” voters into becoming plaintiffs.

Georgia governor signs bill overhauling state’s elections

Georgia Republican Gov. Brian Kemp signed sweeping voting restrictions into law on Thursday, just months after a Democrat won the presidential election in the state for the first time in nearly 30 years.

Law gives Congress more authority in vote count than Constitution allows, op-ed says

Rioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 were acting on the mistaken belief that Congress had the power to determine the winner of the presidential election, a belief that was rooted in a law passed in 1887, according to a March 18 op-ed.

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