Election Law

772 ABA Journal Election Law articles.

Afternoon briefs: TRO lifted against Mary Trump publisher; Jeffrey Epstein associate arrested

Appeals court lifts TRO against Mary Trump publisher

A New York appeals court on Wednesday lifted a temporary restraining order that blocked Simon & Schuster from publishing a tell-all book…

Afternoon Briefs: Prosecutor resigns over Nazi social media post; judge blocks asylum restriction

Prosecutor resigns over shared Facebook post

A Texas prosecutor resigned Monday after she shared a Facebook post that appeared to compare protesters with Nazis. Assistant District Attorney Kaylynn Williford of…

SCOTUS rejects request to allow all Texas voters to use mail-in ballots
The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected an emergency application to allow all voters in Texas to use mail-in ballots.
Afternoon Briefs: Judge admonishes state AG for ignored voting order; court upholds law school’s $2.6M settlement

Judge admonishes Tennessee attorney general’s office for ignoring absentee voting order

Davidson County Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle chastised attorneys from the Tennessee attorney general’s office Thursday for not following the…

Afternoon Briefs: Judicial council halts statewide COVID-19 bail schedule; Amazon pauses police use of facial recognition tech

California ends statewide bail policy enacted to stop COVID-19 spread in jails

The California Judicial Council voted Wednesday to end a statewide emergency bail schedule enacted in early April in…

Afternoon Briefs: DC protesters sue over park ouster; 21 federal courthouses damaged

DC protesters sue over their ouster from Lafayette Square

Protesters and Black Lives Matter D.C. allege in a lawsuit that their ouster from Lafayette Square on June 1 violated their…

Lawyers who donate to judicial campaigns get more indigent defense appointments, study finds
A study of lawyer appointments has found that judges were more likely to appoint lawyers who had contributed to their election campaigns to represent indigent defendants than they were to appoint nondonors.
Ballot box battles are more high-stakes than ever
July 18, 1940: Democrats nominate FDR for unprecedented 3rd term

George Washington, having retired after two terms in office, set a precedent: that serving beyond two terms might suggest the office was intended for a ruler, not a democratically elected leader.

Afternoon Briefs: Trump order limits social media protections; Texas court curbs mail-in ballots

Trump order seeks to curtail legal protections for social media

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Thursday that seeks to reinterpret the Communications Decency Act, which protects websites from…

Federal judge rules Florida can’t require payment of fees before ex-felons can vote
A federal judge ruled Sunday that it is unconstitutional in some circumstances for Florida to require felons who have completed their sentences to pay legal financial obligations before being allowed to vote.
SCOTUS hears arguments on whether ‘faithless electors’ in the Electoral College can switch allegiances

In 2016, for the first time, states removed or punished electors who declined to cast their ballots for their state’s popular-vote winners in the presidential election. The cases involving such “faithless electors” have worked their way up to the high court just as the nation prepares for another presidential election.

Afternoon Briefs: Kentucky travel ban overturned; Wisconsin justices consider stay-at-home extension

Federal judge strikes down Kentucky travel ban

U.S. District Judge William Bertelsman ruled Monday that Kentucky’s restrictions on out-of-state travel are unconstitutional. The travel ban allowed travel outside the state…

More than half of Americans support online voting during COVID-19 pandemic, second ABA civics survey shows

As the COVID-19 pandemic quickly spread across the country, the ABA pivoted its second annual survey of civic literacy to gauge Americans’ support for online voting, as well as their thoughts on how the government should respond to a national emergency.

Afternoon Briefs: 10th Circuit strikes down voter ID law; social distancing could mean long elevator lines

10th Circuit strikes down Kansas voter ID law

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Denver has struck down a Kansas law that required a birth certificate or…

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