Election Law

801 ABA Journal Election Law articles.

Ohio chief justice, a Republican, stands up for Democratic judge blasted by GOP for ballot drop box decision
Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor is condemning “in the strongest possible terms” a GOP statement accusing a Democratic judge of colluding with the Ohio Democratic Party in a ballot drop box decision.
Afternoon Briefs: Judge blocks postal changes; bedroom backdrop for SCOTUS justice’s Constitution Day remarks

Federal judge blocks US Postal Service changes

Ruling from the bench Thursday, U.S. District Judge Stanley Bastian of Yakima, Washington, blocked U.S. Postal Service changes that slowed mail delivery. Ruling…

Afternoon Briefs: Trump’s census count order blocked; lawyer dies by suicide as cops close in

Court blocks Trump’s census count order

A special three-judge panel of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York has blocked President Donald Trump’s order to exclude…

En banc court rules Florida can require felons to pay fines before voting; 5 Trump appointees join majority
An en banc federal appeals court has ruled that Florida did not violate the Constitution by requiring felons to pay fines, fees, costs and restitution before they are able to vote.
More law firms are moving to make Election Day a paid holiday
As a growing number of large law firms offer their employees paid time off to participate in the Nov. 3 presidential election, the legal community may wonder, is this a one-time holiday or a lasting trend?
Chemerinsky: Will SCOTUS rulings help decide the 2020 presidential election?
There now have been six instances in which the U.S. Supreme Court has dealt with issues concerning COVID-19 and the election process. The court repeatedly has made clear that it does not want the federal courts changing the rules of an election, even when necessary to protect the right to vote in a pandemic.
Afternoon Briefs: Alaska attorney general resigns over text messages; lawsuit claims racial bias in concussion deal

Alaska attorney general resigns after text messages disclosed

Alaska Attorney General Kevin Clarkson has resigned after a news investigation found that he sent more than 550 text messages in March…

Afternoon Briefs: New law raises stakes for protesters; ‘Law Tigers’ sues over ‘TigerLaw’ nickname

New state camping law raises stakes for protesters

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee has signed a bill that makes it a felony punishable by up to six years in prison to…

Judge stays mail-in ballot suit after Trump campaign provides little evidence of fraud

A federal judge has stayed a challenge by President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign to Pennsylvania ballot procedures to allow state courts to consider voting issues in separate suits.

U.S. District…

19 states and DC file lawsuits accusing postmaster general of jeopardizing election
Six states and the District of Columbia claim in a lawsuit filed Friday that U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy's changes to postal service operations are undermining mail-in voting.
The Supreme Court’s ‘shadow docket’ is drawing increasing scrutiny

The U.S. Supreme Court’s “shadow docket” is coming in from the dark. The shadow docket has attracted growing scrutiny recently as President Donald Trump’s administration has repeatedly filed applications with the high court seeking emergency relief on a range of matters.

Afternoon Briefs: Trump pardons Susan B. Anthony; suspect in lawyer’s murder claims memory loss

Trump pardons Susan B. Anthony

President Donald Trump said Tuesday he is granting a posthumous pardon to Susan B. Anthony, the women’s suffragist who was convicted for casting a…

ABA releases a cookbook to mark centennial of 19th Amendment’s ratification
“The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex,” reads the 19th Amendment, which was ratified on this day 100 years ago.
Supreme Court allows eased voting requirements in Rhode Island and notes state support
The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday refused to interfere with a consent decree that allowed Rhode Island voters to use mail-in ballots without having to get two witnesses or a notary to verify their signature.
Another ‘shadow docket’ decision? SCOTUS once again blocks relaxed election procedures
The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday stayed an injunction that would have made it easier to place a measure on the ballot seeking to reform Oregon’s redistricting process.

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