ABA Journal

Environmental Law

756 ABA Journal Environmental Law articles.

Happy the elephant’s quest for personhood heads to top state court; rice and lakes also file suit

New York’s top court will hear the case of Happy the elephant’s bid for personhood and release from the Bronx Zoo in New York City on May 18.

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS will hear inmate’s appeal of DNA testing; prosecutor accidentally shoots himself

Supreme Court will hear death row inmate’s DNA test bid

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear the case of a Texas death row inmate who said DNA…

Pen Pals

Matthew Strugar received the first mysterious postcard in August 2018. On one side, two black-and-white patterned orcas leapt into the air from their large tank of turquoise water at SeaWorld. The handwritten plea on the back of the postcard was signed, “Sincerely, Your imprisoned orca clients.” Most lawyers would have found the note odd, but for Strugar, it struck a familiar chord.

SCOTUS will consider whether California pork law may violate dormant commerce clause

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to decide whether pork producers can sue over a California law said to have the effect of regulating pig enclosures nationwide.

Should the UN establish a right to a healthy environment? ABA urges US to vote yes

In a late February briefing, Nadia Ahmad introduced a group of ABA members and Capitol Hill staffers to Resolution 48/13—a measure adopted by the United Nations Human Rights Council that for the first time recognizes having a clean, healthy and sustainable environment as a human right.

Chemerinsky: SCOTUS could make significant ruling on EPA’s authority to fight climate change—or not

In a term likely filled with blockbuster cases, West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency is an enigma: It could turn out to be unimportant and dismissed without a decision; it may be a major ruling on the scope of the EPA’s power; or it could be a huge decision about judicial review of agency decisions. The case, which was argued on Feb. 28, arose in an unusual procedural posture that may cause the court to dismiss it. But if the justices reach the merits, it could be a decision of great significance about environmental and administrative law.

Animal cruelty can qualify as domestic violence, state supreme court says

An animal cruelty conviction for beating and killing an intimate partner’s dog can qualify for a domestic violence designation under Washington law, the Washington Supreme Court has ruled.

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson writes first appellate opinion; she’s seen as a potential SCOTUS nominee

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has released the first opinion written by Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, who is considered a potential U.S. Supreme Court nominee to replace retiring Justice Stephen G. Breyer.

Troubled Waters

As interest in outdoor recreation has surged, more people are clashing with property owners over the right to be on the waterways. The conflict over the uses of—and even the definitions of—public and private space is a legal conundrum bedeviling locales across the country.

Meet 12 ABA members who inspired us in 2021

The ABA Journal regularly profiles exceptional ABA members in its Members Who Inspire series. In the past year, we featured many in the legal field who are encouraging and energizing others with their good work, including advocating for inmates on death row, mentoring prospective law students of African descent and fighting to stop bullying in the workplace.

Check out our 9 favorite Instagram posts from 2021

It's been quite a year in the legal industry and for coverage here at the ABA Journal, and it's hard to believe that 2022 is right around the corner.

How I went from civil litigator to animal policy strategist

Nearly 40 years into my legal career, I own and manage the Animal Policy Group and am shoulder-deep in every issue involving pets in the United States, usually on behalf of the biggest players in the pet sector—from veterinary to pharmaceutical, nutrition to retail and even veterinary colleges.

ABA observers will share their takeaways from the UN climate change conference in Glasgow

Next week, ABA members who attended and observed COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland, will share their takeaways from the annual summit and ideas for how others can get involved.

Officer who shot service dogs not entitled to qualified immunity, 8th Circuit says

A federal appeals court ruled Monday that a Minneapolis police officer was not entitled to qualified immunity in a lawsuit alleging that his shooting of two service dogs violated the constitutional rights of their owners.

Weekly Briefs: Steven Bannon indicted for contempt of Congress; DC Circuit gives Trump initial records victory

Steve Bannon is indicted for contempt of Congress

Steve Bannon, a former adviser to former President Donald Trump, was indicted Friday for contempt of Congress for failing to comply with…

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