ABA Journal

Family Law

2316 ABA Journal Family Law articles.

Top Idaho court strikes down grandparent visitation law that is based on best interest of child

The Idaho Supreme Court has struck down a state law that allows grandparents and great-grandparents to be granted visitation over the objection of fit parents—if it is in the best interest of the child.

Weekly Briefs: ABA supports marriage equality law; Stanford offers new model for legal ed loans

ABA president calls on Senate to support Respect for Marriage Act

ABA President Deborah Enix-Ross is calling on members of the U.S. Senate to vote for the Respect for Marriage…

Law prof’s suit against law school alleges race and gender discrimination, family status bias

A federal lawsuit alleging race, gender and disability discrimination was filed Friday against the University of Michigan and its law school by a law professor who is Black and a single mother.

Ban on gender-affirming procedures for transgender youths is sex discrimination, 8th Circuit says

A federal appeals court has upheld an injunction blocking Arkansas’ ban on “gender transition procedures” for youths younger than age 18.

Texas Supreme Court’s advisory committee supports rule allowing judicial approval of abortions for minors

An advisory committee for the Texas Supreme Court voted unanimously Friday to support a state rule that allows judges to authorize abortions for minors without their parents’ consent.

Supreme Court should uphold Indian Child Welfare Act, ABA says in amicus brief

The ABA has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold the Indian Child Welfare Act, writing in an amicus brief filed Thursday that Congress enacted the statute “under valid constitutional authority and on the basis of an extensive body of evidence and law.”

Ex-judges ordered to pay more than $200M to victims of juvenile detention corruption scheme

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered two former Pennsylvania judges who orchestrated the “kids for cash” corruption scandal to pay more than $200 million to hundreds of their victims.

Self-defense law doesn’t protect officer who shot at charging dog and injured child, top state court rules

A Kansas law allowing the use of deadly force against an aggressor does not protect people defending themselves who act recklessly and harm a bystander, the state’s top court has ruled.

After collaborating with bestselling author, judge discusses new solo book

After several collaborations with bestselling author James Patterson, Judge David Ellis of Illinois, a prolific novelist, decided to go it alone for his latest book, Look Closer.

Traci Feit Love continues to deliver pro bono services while negotiating through the trauma and injustices she witnesses

Lawyers have been organizing in large numbers during the last six years to offer pro bono legal services to immigrants, racial minorities and small businesses affected by COVID-19. The new post-Roe landscape is no different.

Licensed paralegals program in Oregon gets final approval

The Oregon Supreme Court has given final approval to a program that allows licensed paralegals to provide limited legal services in family law and landlord-tenant cases.

Ex-husband is allowed to represent embryo in wrongful death suit against abortion clinic

A judge in Arizona has allowed an ex-husband to serve as personal representative of an embryo in a wrongful death lawsuit that he filed against an abortion clinic and its doctors.

Suit seeks damages for traumatic event witnessed over FaceTime; bystander definition at issue

A woman who saw her mother choking on mucus at her nursing home during a FaceTime call has filed a lawsuit against the facility for negligent infliction of emotional distress.

Lawyer gets suspension after posting secret nude photos of his then-wife

A Philadelphia lawyer will be suspended for three years after taking secret nude photos of his then-wife and posting them to the website wifelovers.com without her knowledge.

ABA supports several of the Biden administration’s proposed nursing home reforms

Nina Kohn, a professor at the Syracuse University College of Law, has long focused on the intersection of the law and the experiences of older adults, including those who need long-term care. In recent months, she has helped draw attention to three policies that closely align with nursing home reforms the Biden administration announced in February.

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