International Courts/Tribunals

725 ABA Journal International Courts/Tribunals articles.

California law school gets donation that’s said to be ‘one of the biggest in history’ from tribe to university
The Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, a California tribe, has donated $15 million to the University of California at Los Angeles School of Law to create full tuition scholarships for students interested in careers as tribal legal advocates.
A look at Netflix’s ‘Longmire,’ Indian Country and the battle for jurisdiction
Being born and reared in western Oklahoma, I was always fairly familiar with the tribes in that area. Even though I don’t have any American Indian blood, plenty of my friends do, and I have had the opportunity to grow up experiencing the wealth of history and culture they offer.
Afternoon Briefs: 4th Circuit rules for transgender youth; tribe objects to execution

4th Circuit rules for transgender youth on bathroom policy

The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Richmond, Virginia, has ruled for former high school student Gavin Grimm, a…

Can plaintiffs from other countries hold China legally accountable for the coronavirus pandemic in their respective courts?
SCOTUS delivers on US promises, at least partly, made to Native Americans after Trail of Tears

The opening words of Justice Neil M. Gorsuch’s opinion for the U.S. Supreme Court in a major case on American Indian law leaped off the page for many advocates for Native Americans. The court, in a 5-4 decision on July 9, held that the Creek reservation in eastern Oklahoma had never been “disestablished” by Congress.

SCOTUS rules for pro se petitioner in tribal case that could upend hundreds of convictions
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a large part of eastern central Oklahoma is an American Indian reservation, a decision that calls into question hundreds of state court convictions.
Chemerinsky: It’s going to be an unusual May in the Supreme Court
For the first time in recent memory, the Supreme Court will be holding oral arguments in May, and for the first time ever, they will be by telephone. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, oral arguments were canceled in the Supreme Court in March and April.
Behind bars in Scandinavia, and what we can learn

“We help each other—that’s what we do here is we help each other.” It wasn’t the sentiment I expected to hear from a guard describing his interaction with inmates at the high-security prison outside Stockholm.

Afternoon Briefs: Pelosi prepares impeachment articles for Senate; lawyer faces charges over deceased father’s pension

Pelosi plans to send impeachment articles to Senate next week

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a letter to House Democrats on Friday that she is preparing to send the…

The case for the International Criminal Court: Why it deserves our support

Like many post-World War II global institutions in today’s political climate, the International Criminal Court can feel disconnected from the ideals and optimism that created it as the world’s…

European Union high court sends new signals on reach of internet regulation

A recent pair of cases out of the European Union have provided new insight into the reach of the EU’s regulation of the internet. Both cases revolve around whether an EU member state’s court can order an internet company to take down or de-list information online and whether that power extends beyond the EU.

Europe’s top court rules ‘right to be forgotten’ doesn’t apply to internet search results worldwide

The European Union’s top court ruled Tuesday that Google and other search engines are not obligated to delete links to websites and databases worldwide under a “right to be forgotten”…

Imprisoned Saudi lawyer receives this year’s ABA International Human Rights Award

Waleed Abu al-Khair, a human rights lawyer who was convicted on anti-terrorism charges and sentenced to 15 years in prison—simply for calling for the rule of law in Saudi Arabia—will receive the 2019 ABA International Human Rights Award during the ABA Annual Meeting in San Francisco. “Abu al-Khair epitomizes the ideals of what lawyers around the world are fighting for,” ABA President Bob Carlson says.

Gorsuch joins with liberal justices in Supreme Court ruling for Indian tribe’s hunting rights

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch joined with four liberal justices on Monday in a ruling for a member of the Crow Tribe who was arrested for offseason hunting.

Congolese warlord convicted of war crimes with the help of ABA ROLI
Last month, after years of efforts, the warlord Marcel Habarugira Rangira, lieutenant colonel of the Congolese armed forces, was convicted of war crimes before a military tribunal in Goma, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Mireille Kahatwa Amani was one of the chief attorneys from the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative who worked to convict him.

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