Juvenile Justice

435 ABA Journal Juvenile Justice articles.

Chemerinsky: The Supreme Court returns to a term like no other
No other first Monday in October, the traditional start of a new U.S. Supreme Court term, ever has been like this one. With the country still in the midst of a pandemic, oral arguments will be held by telephone as they were in May. The justices and the country are still reeling from the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Sept. 18. Looming large is the coming confirmation battle over the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, who would add another staunch conservative to the court.
How losing RBG could shape criminal justice for years to come

Juvenile lifers, victims of police misconduct and immigrants convicted of minor crimes are among those with a lot at stake before the changing court

Afternoon Briefs: Bill Gates Sr. dies at 94; federal judiciary seeks $500M for better security

Bill Gates Sr., lawyer and ABA Medal winner, dies at 94

Lawyer and 2009 ABA Medal winner Bill Gates Sr. has died at age 94. Gates was a name…

Children should be protected from unreasonable restraints, seclusion and searches, ABA House says
The well-being and rights of children and youth were addressed in three resolutions approved by the ABA House of Delegates at the annual meeting on Monday.
Judge won’t release teen detained for failing to do homework while on probation
A Michigan teenager will remain in juvenile detention after violating probation by refusing to do her online schoolwork.
Police union sues state attorney general over plans to publish names of disciplined cops
The union that represents New Jersey state troopers is suing New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal to stop his plan to publicly release the names of troopers who have been disciplined.
Defense lawyer who didn’t probe death-row client’s bad childhood was deficient, SCOTUS says
A defense lawyer who failed to investigate his capital client’s tumultuous childhood provided ineffective assistance of counsel, the U.S. Supreme Court held Monday.
Supreme Court’s failure to determine ‘irreparable corruption’ in juvenile case risks ignoring precedent, ABA says in brief
In an amicus brief filed Friday, the ABA urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a judgment against a Mississippi man who is serving life in prison without parole because the sentencing court failed to determine whether the crime he committed as a juvenile reflected "transient immaturity" or "irreparable corruption."
The novel coronavirus is leaving foster children with nowhere to go
The foster care system, built on frequent movements of children from one home to another and regular in-person supervision, has been especially wracked with confusion and dread by the coronavirus crisis.
Amid novel coronavirus fears, juvenile lockups are cutting visits
Ophelia Davis, of Columbia, South Carolina, says she doesn't know if she'll see her grandson again. That's not just because she's in the demographic most vulnerable to the coronavirus—she's 67, has an autoimmune disease and is currently struggling with a cough that she thinks is just the pollen. It's also that her grandson is in juvenile detention, and as has been happening across the country, the jail where he's confined has indefinitely ended all visits between families and their children.
Afternoon Briefs: Mueller indictment of Russian firms tossed; ex-juvenile delinquent now a lawyer

Judge tosses indictment of Russian firms at prosecutors’ request

U.S. District Judge Dabney Friedrich granted prosecutors’ request Monday to toss an indictment against two Russian companies accused of…

Afternoon Briefs: Supreme Court to hear juvenile sentencing case; Led Zeppelin wins ‘Stairway’ fight

Supreme Court takes another case over juvenile life-without-parole sentences

The Supreme Court agreed on Monday to determine if the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment requires the court…

New podcast from ‘Making a Murderer’ lawyers sheds light on false confessions

Wrongful Conviction: False Confessions is a new podcast hosted by two of the nation’s foremost experts in the field, Steve Drizin and Laura Nirider, law professors and co-directors of Northwestern University’s Center on Wrongful Convictions. The new series was born from their experience on the Netflix documentary Making a Murderer.

Afternoon Briefs: Legal words flummox child murder defendant; judge nixes ‘The Godfather Part II’ clip

News Roundup

Judge urges former teen serial killer to donate his brain to science
A Pennsylvania judge who resentenced a convicted serial killer on Tuesday urged the man to consider donating his brain to scientists studying criminal behavior.

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