Juvenile Justice

427 ABA Journal Juvenile Justice articles.

The novel coronavirus is leaving foster children with nowhere to go
The foster care system, built on frequent movements of children from one home to another and regular in-person supervision, has been especially wracked with confusion and dread by the coronavirus crisis.
Amid novel coronavirus fears, juvenile lockups are cutting visits
Ophelia Davis, of Columbia, South Carolina, says she doesn't know if she'll see her grandson again. That's not just because she's in the demographic most vulnerable to the coronavirus—she's 67, has an autoimmune disease and is currently struggling with a cough that she thinks is just the pollen. It's also that her grandson is in juvenile detention, and as has been happening across the country, the jail where he's confined has indefinitely ended all visits between families and their children.
Afternoon Briefs: Mueller indictment of Russian firms tossed; ex-juvenile delinquent now a lawyer

Judge tosses indictment of Russian firms at prosecutors’ request

U.S. District Judge Dabney Friedrich granted prosecutors’ request Monday to toss an indictment against two Russian companies accused of…

Afternoon Briefs: Supreme Court to hear juvenile sentencing case; Led Zeppelin wins ‘Stairway’ fight

Supreme Court takes another case over juvenile life-without-parole sentences

The Supreme Court agreed on Monday to determine if the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment requires the court…

New podcast from ‘Making a Murderer’ lawyers sheds light on false confessions

Wrongful Conviction: False Confessions is a new podcast hosted by two of the nation’s foremost experts in the field, Steve Drizin and Laura Nirider, law professors and co-directors of Northwestern University’s Center on Wrongful Convictions. The new series was born from their experience on the Netflix documentary Making a Murderer.

Afternoon Briefs: Legal words flummox child murder defendant; judge nixes ‘The Godfather Part II’ clip

News Roundup

Judge urges former teen serial killer to donate his brain to science
A Pennsylvania judge who resentenced a convicted serial killer on Tuesday urged the man to consider donating his brain to scientists studying criminal behavior.
Afternoon Briefs: 9-year-old is charged with murder; court nominee won’t answer Ukraine questions

9-year-old boy is charged with murder

A 9-year-old boy in central Illinois has been charged with arson and five counts of murder for allegedly causing a mobile home fire in…

Afternoon Briefs: Murder charge against 9-year-old tossed; judge bans mystery proceedings

Judge tosses murder charge against 9-year-old boy

A murder defendant cried and hugged his father after Michigan Judge David Tomlinson tossed a murder charge against him Friday. The defendant was…

Seattle lawyer focuses on systemic changes to end youth homelessness
Three lawyers are among this year’s MacArthur Foundation ‘genius grant’ winners

Lawyers working in the field of criminal justice reform, restorative justice and cyber harassment are among this year’s 26 MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” winners.

The winners will each receive a…

Afternoon Briefs: Officer fired after arrest of 6-year-olds; judge orders Trump deposition

School resource officer fired after arresting two 6-year-olds

A school resource officer has been fired by the Orlando Police Department after arresting two 6-year-old children Thursday. Officials initially said the…

ABA urges Supreme Court to follow Miller standard for juvenile punishments
In an amicus brief filed Tuesday, the ABA urged the U.S. Supreme Court to recognize that juveniles’ “diminished culpability and greater prospects for reform” separate them from adults and that those whose crimes “reflect transient immaturity, rather than irreparable corruption” should not face life in prison.
Students of color with disabilities are being pushed into the school-to-prison pipeline, study finds
Liberating criminal justice data: How a Florida law provides a blueprint for the nation

In a self-imposed Sisyphean task, the team at Measures for Justice travels the U.S. unearthing, collecting and publishing criminal justice data. Today, Christian Gossett, district attorney for Winnebago County, Wisconsin, says more people are being released quicker pretrial, and he’s working with researchers to improve equity in diversion, thanks to the initial data made available by Measures for Justice.

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