Legal History

1079 ABA Journal Legal History articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Chinese human rights lawyer released; AG Barr orders increased home confinement

Chinese human rights lawyer is released from prison

Chinese human rights lawyer Wang Quanzhang has been released from prison after nearly five years in custody, according to his wife, Li…

May 14, 1969: The Spectacular Fall of Abe Fortas
PBS series ‘A More or Less Perfect Union’ focuses on the Constitution
Outbreaks of disease have shuttered the Supreme Court going back more than 2 centuries

When the U.S. Supreme Court announced this week that its March sitting of oral arguments would be postponed “in keeping with public health precautions recommended in response to COVID-19,” the statement included some historical references for support—going back as far as 227 years ago.

How to achieve vocal power in and out of the courtroom
Public speaking is a crucial part of working as a lawyer. It is especially important for female lawyers who are claiming their vocal authority in speaking roles in courts.
Afternoon Briefs: Jim Bakker warned about COVID-19 claims; Reed Smith widow loses in 7th Circuit

Televangelist told to stop peddling COVID-19 elixir

Two state attorneys general and two federal agencies are trying to stop televangelist Jim Bakker from peddling a supplement called Silver Solution as…

Afternoon Briefs: Some of Justice Scalia’s papers are now public; House lifts ERA deadline

Some of Justice Scalia’s papers are now publicly available

The legal and academic papers of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia are now available for public viewing, at…

Prosecutors consider reviewing convictions in Malcolm X’s murder after documentary raises questions
The Manhattan district attorney’s office will conduct a preliminary review of the convictions in the case of Malcolm X’s 1965 murder, a first step in deciding whether to investigate further.
How safe is your right to vote?

A book by a University of Baltimore law prof tells the story of historical efforts of voter suppression and the modern-day dangers that face voters now. In this new episode of the Modern Law Library, Gilda R. Daniels talks to Lee Rawles.

March 9, 1916: Pancho Villa’s Battle of Columbus
Fair game: Does the fair use doctrine apply to Andy Warhol’s pop art?
The acclaimed “Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again” exhibit of more than 400 of Andy Warhol’s works has been making the rounds from New York to San Francisco to Chicago. Even casual observers have a sense of Warhol’s groundbreaking pop-art style. Yet there is one surprising legal question of fair use and transformative value that begs consideration: Just what is a “Warhol”?
Take a gander at our favorite 2019 slideshow galleries

From famous celebrity prenups to groundbreaking black lawyers to First Amendment milestones, the ABA Journal presents our favorite slideshow galleries from this year. Which gallery was your favorite?


‘Watchmen’ shows just how far policing police could go

“Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?”

Although the Latin used by Juvenal in his ancient Roman Satires literally translates to “Who will guard the guards themselves?” comic book author Alan Moore transported…

Is ‘The Irishman’ right about Hoffa? US attorney promises ‘more to come’
The U.S. attorney for the office that investigated Jimmy Hoffa’s disappearance isn’t relying on the Netflix movie The Irishman for its theories of the case. Nor is a law professor whose stepfather was portrayed as the man who drove Hoffa to his death.
A prosecutors’ leadership retreat in Berlin offers a stark reminder to remain vigilant

On a personal level, it was difficult to travel to a country responsible for the atrocities of the Holocaust and face ghosts of the past. But it was also heartening to see how Germany has reckoned with its shameful history. And there is much we can learn from that, writes Miriam Aroni Krinsky, who spent 15 years as a federal prosecutor and is the executive director of Fair and Just Prosecution.

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