ABA Journal

New York

3619 ABA Journal New York articles.

Judge who appeared determined to avoid mandatory sentence is removed from case

A judge who appeared determined to impose a reduced sentence on a woman who cooperated in a sexual exploitation prosecution has been removed from the case.

Afternoon Briefs: Judge compares AR-15 to Swiss Army knife; suit claims GC wasn’t rehired because of long-haul COVID-19

Federal judge strikes down ban on assault weapons

Citing the Second Amendment, U.S. District Judge Roger Benitez of the Southern District of California struck down California’s ban on assault weapons…

In New York, a 7-year-old is arrested for rape; should the age for juvenile prosecutions be raised?

Children in New York can be charged as juvenile delinquents beginning at age 7, which explains why a boy of that age could be charged with rape in March in upstate Brasher Falls, New York.

Afternoon Briefs: McDonald’s faces Illinois privacy suit; NYPD accused of violating graffiti artists’ rights

McDonald’s sued over voice recognition software

McDonald’s is accused of violating Illinois’ biometric privacy law by using voice recognition software to recognize repeat customers at drive-thrus. The suit, filed in…

Afternoon Briefs: MLB faces federal lawsuit for moving All-Star Game; entertainment lawyer starts singing career at 92

Atlanta business group sues MLB for moving All-Star Game

Job Creators Network, a conservative organization that represents small businesses, is suing Major League Baseball for moving the July All-Star Game…

Lawyer described as ‘Don Quixote of student debt’ relief decides to run for Congress

A lawyer who has been pursuing relief for student borrowers in bankruptcy court has decided to run for Congress in 2022 on a platform that includes reforming rules for cancellation of such debt.

This firm is fighting mandatory COVID-19 vaccines with legal filings and warnings

The New York law firm Siri & Glimstad is fighting mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations with litigation and warning letters dispatched to schools and employers.

Goldberg Segalla is sued over alleged leak of woman’s personal information on PACER

A fashion model has filed a lawsuit alleging that Goldberg Segalla exposed her Social Security number and other personal information in a PACER filing.

Little-known chapter of labor history is illuminated in union attorney’s new book

When Mark A. Torres was researching his first novel, A Stirring in the North Fork, he came across a piece of local history that he'd never known. Starting during the labor shortages of World War II, Long Island, New York, had been home to dozens of camps for several decades, some of which kept migrant workers in deplorable—and often deadly—conditions.

These factors help predict whether a law grad will pass the bar on the first or second try, study says

A survey of law graduates who took the New York bar exam in the years before the COVID-19 pandemic has identified six factors that contribute to success.

Afternoon Briefs: Controversial remarks by ‘QAnon shaman’ lawyer; progressive district attorney wins primary

Lawyer for ‘QAnon shaman’ says rioters are ‘short-bus people’

Albert Watkins, the lawyer for the accused U.S. Capitol Hill rioter known as the “QAnon Shaman,” told Talking Points Memo…

Afternoon Briefs: Cops charged with selling crash info to lawyers; deal reached on McGahn testimony

Officers charged with selling crash info to lawyers

A retired New York police officer and two current officers were charged Tuesday with taking kickbacks from towing companies. Heather Busch, Robert…

Afternoon Briefs: NRA bankruptcy petition tossed; prosecutors say man imprisoned for over 40 years is innocent

Judge tosses NRA bankruptcy petition

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Harlin D. “Cooter” Hale of Dallas has dismissed a Chapter 11 petition filed by the National Rifle Association in its bid…

If not removed, rock with Confederate flag should be factored into custody dispute, appeals court says

A mother in New York risks losing shared custody of her mixed-race child as a result of a small Confederate flag painted on a rock near her driveway.

Lawyer who told judge he had no knowledge of suit filed under his name gets no prison time for lie

A California lawyer won’t face prison time for lying to a judge about his knowledge of a lawsuit filed against General Motors for clients who were accused of seeking to profit from a fictitious settlement with the automaker.

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