ABA Journal

Washington

589 ABA Journal Washington articles.

California law requiring women on corporate boards is unconstitutional, judge rules

A California judge has struck down a law requiring public corporations headquartered in the state to include a minimum number of women on their boards of directors.

Gorsuch and Kavanaugh sour on Lemon endorsement test in praying football coach case

During oral arguments Monday in the case of a praying football coach, U.S. Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh appeared ready to abandon a Lemon endorsement test in establishment clause cases.

Supreme Court considers whether high school football coach has right to pray on the field

The case of Kennedy v. Bremerton School District arrives at a U.S. Supreme Court dominated by conservatives who have shown special solicitude to religious liberty claims in recent years.

Judge acknowledges using racial slur ‘in an explanatory context’

A Washington judge accused of using the N-word won’t say whether she plans to run for reelection, but her recent registration with a state commission suggests that she intends to start raising campaign funds.

Former judge faces prison time after pleading guilty to sexual assault of 2 court employees

A former judge in Washington, who was accused of sexually assaulting two former court employees, agreed to a plea deal as his trial was set to begin Monday.

Law that keeps racist covenants in separate public record helps preserve history, top state court says

The Washington Supreme Court has said a new state law strikes a balance between removing racial covenants from a home’s title while keeping them part of the public record.

Many federal courts ease mask requirements; judges often retain discretion in their courtrooms

More than a dozen federal courts have eased or dropped mask requirements since the beginning of March.

Escrow officer accused of transferring nearly $2M to scammer gives up license as limited practice officer

An escrow officer in Washington has given up her certification as a limited practice officer after she was accused of wiring nearly $2 million in client escrow funds to a scammer.

Animal cruelty can qualify as domestic violence, state supreme court says

An animal cruelty conviction for beating and killing an intimate partner’s dog can qualify for a domestic violence designation under Washington law, the Washington Supreme Court has ruled.

Supreme Court will hear case of praying football coach

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear the case of a high school football coach who lost his job after defying the school district’s orders to stop praying with students at the 50-yard line after games.

Some states seek to eliminate racial bias in jury selection with peremptory-challenge changes

Some states are changing the rules for peremptory challenges—and in one case, eliminating them altogether—in an effort to eliminate racial bias in jury selection.

Weekly Briefs: New charges against lawyer accused of staging his shooting; Christian florist settles

Suspended lawyer Alex Murdaugh faces new charges

Suspended South Carolina lawyer Alex Murdaugh, previously charged in an alleged scheme to have himself killed for insurance money, is facing 27…

Supreme Court will decide whether innkeeper can sue border agent for First Amendment damages

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide whether the owner of a bed and breakfast establishment called the Smugglers Inn can sue a border patrol agent for damages under the First and Fourth Amendments.

Gender affects access to courts and treatment in the justice system, Washington state study says

Gender affects the treatment of people in Washington state’s court system, particularly the treatment of women of color, LGBTQ people and women in poverty, according to a report released on…

9th Circuit orders lower court to review decision over accessibility at baseball stadium

A federal appeals court on Wednesday ruled in favor of plaintiffs who alleged that spectators using wheelchairs at T-Mobile Park, the home of the Seattle Mariners Major League Baseball team, had inadequate sightlines under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Read more ...