ABA Journal

10th Circuit Court

213 ABA Journal 10th Circuit Court articles.

Few federal courts report that they require COVID-19 vaccines for court employees

Few federal courts have reported that they are requiring COVID-19 vaccines for court workers, although an order this week requires the employees to report their vaccination status.

Ban on topless women doesn’t violate equal protection clause, 4th Circuit says; concurrence questions precedent

A ban on women going topless in public in Ocean City, Maryland, doesn’t violate the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Richmond, Virginia, has ruled.

Web designer who offers wedding websites can be compelled to serve same-sex couples, 10th Circuit says

A Colorado anti-discrimination law can be used to compel a website designer who wants to create wedding websites to offer her services to people celebrating same-sex marriages, a federal appeals court ruled Monday.

Top state court is second to rule that gas stations can be liable for selling fuel to drunken drivers

Gasoline stations in New Mexico can be liable for selling fuel to drivers they know or have reason to know are intoxicated, the New Mexico Supreme Court ruled Monday.

Afternoon Briefs: LSC could see $600M in 2022 funding; Netflix’s ‘Tiger King’ to receive shorter prison sentence

Legal Services Corp. could receive largest funding increase under new legislation

The House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations approved on Thursday funding legislation that includes $600 million for the Legal…

Afternoon Briefs: Internet research is costly for juror; bar dues claim partly resurrected

Federal juror’s internet research cost over $11K

A federal judge in New Jersey has held a juror in contempt and fined him more than $11,000 for conducting internet research on…

Afternoon Briefs: Trump-boosting fake lawyer sentenced; 3 of Biden’s new judicial picks have public defender experience

Trump-boosting fake lawyer sentenced to prison

A Tennessee man who founded Students for Trump has been sentenced to 13 months in prison for posing as an elite lawyer and taking…

No federal appeals court has more female than male judges; which one is evenly balanced?

Just one federal appeals court has an equal number of active male and female judges.

Afternoon Briefs: 2 well-known law firms shun merger idea; law firm of Biden’s brother touts connection

Quinn Emanuel and Boies Schiller shun merger idea

Neither Boies Schiller Flexner nor Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan are embracing a legal recruiter’s suggestion that the two firms should merge.…

Afternoon Briefs: Legal professionals stressed, surveys say; disbarred lawyer pleads guilty in 9/11 theft

Legal professionals are stressed and depressed, surveys say

More than 85% of legal professionals surveyed by Law.com said the upcoming election has affected their mental health, leading to symptoms that…

Trump plans to nominate a woman to replace Ginsburg; who are the top contenders?

President Donald Trump told Fox & Friends on Monday that he hopes to name a successor to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg this upcoming Friday or Saturday. Ginsburg died this past Friday at age 87 from complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas.

A look at Netflix’s ‘Longmire,’ Indian Country and the battle for jurisdiction

Being born and reared in western Oklahoma, I was always fairly familiar with the tribes in that area. Even though I don’t have any American Indian blood, plenty of my friends do, and I have had the opportunity to grow up experiencing the wealth of history and culture they offer.

SCOTUS delivers on US promises, at least partly, made to Native Americans after Trail of Tears

The opening words of Justice Neil M. Gorsuch’s opinion for the U.S. Supreme Court in a major case on American Indian law leaped off the page for many advocates for Native Americans. The court, in a 5-4 decision on July 9, held that the Creek reservation in eastern Oklahoma had never been “disestablished” by Congress.

States can penalize wayward presidential electors, Supreme Court rules

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that states can enforce an elector's pledge to support the winner of the state popular vote in presidential elections.

SCOTUS hears arguments on whether ‘faithless electors’ in the Electoral College can switch allegiances

In 2016, for the first time, states removed or punished electors who declined to cast their ballots for their state’s popular-vote winners in the presidential election. The cases involving such “faithless electors” have worked their way up to the high court just as the nation prepares for another presidential election.

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