ABA Journal

Consumer Law

1830 ABA Journal Consumer Law articles.

Doctrine of laches, ‘speculative’ claim doom antitrust suits against Facebook; FTC gets second chance

In a pair of decisions Monday, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., tossed antitrust lawsuits filed against Facebook by the Federal Trade Commission and the vast majority of state attorneys general.

Thomas, liberal justices dissent in SCOTUS standing decision: ‘Pithy catchphrase’ limits Congress’ power

In a 5-4 decision on constitutional standing, the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday limited which consumers can sue over erroneous TransUnion credit reports that flagged them as potential terrorists, drug traffickers and other serious criminals.

Consumer suit alleges ‘Hint of Lime’ packaging overstates the fruit amount in Tostitos chips

A federal lawsuit filed last month against Frito-Lay North America Inc. has alleged that the maker of the corn chips, potato chips and other snack foods misleads consumers by touting a “Hint of Lime” in Tostitos chips that apparently contain only a “negligible amount of lime.”

Amazon drops arbitration requirement after facing over 75,000 demands

Many companies require their employees and customers to resolve disputes through arbitration rather than in the courtroom. Now, Amazon is no longer one of them.

California often leads the way in passing environmental and consumer protection laws

A slew of measures passed in California in recent years in hopes of expanding consumer or environmental protections further afield. Whether it’s product ingredients or data privacy or pollution prevention, California is frequently where such laws start.

Afternoon Briefs: Judge denies QAnon connection; investors sue over ‘Voltswagen’ prank press release

Pennsylvania judge denies any QAnon connection

A Philadelphia judge running for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is denying any connection to QAnon and its conspiracy theories. Judge Paula Patrick told the…

Ruling in payday loan case, Supreme Court curbs ability of FTC to obtain restitution

The Federal Trade Commission will have to follow a more cumbersome procedure to obtain restitution or disgorgement as a result of a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruling Thursday.

Departing lawyers who copied firm’s databases may be liable for unfair business practices, top state court says

Departing lawyers who downloaded a “treasure trove” of proprietary materials from their Boston law firm may be liable for unfair or deceptive business practices, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has ruled.

Afternoon Briefs: ACLU wants lawyer’s libel lawsuit tossed; Dershowitz gives limited advice in MyPillow CEO suit

ACLU seeks dismissal of lawyer’s libel suit

The Georgia Supreme Court has agreed to consider whether a lawyer’s libel lawsuit against the American Civil Liberties Union may go to trial.…

Afternoon Briefs: Florida lawmaker says he’s ‘Christian, not an attorney;’ suit challenges hotel resort fees

Lawmaker says he’s ‘Christian, not an attorney’

A Florida lawmaker says he was just joking when he said told a Jewish colleague that he was a “Christian, not an attorney.”…

Afternoon Briefs: BigLaw firm offers gifts on top of bonuses; second state adopts consumer privacy law

Associates at this BigLaw firm get pricey gifts

Associates at Davis Polk & Wardwell are getting a choice of gifts as a thanks for their hard work during the COVID-19…

Afternoon Briefs: Another state plans remote bar exam in July; Texas AG sues electric company over huge bills

So far, 9 jurisdictions have plan for remote bar exam in July

California’s July 2021 bar exam will be remote, the California Supreme Court announced Friday. The first testing day,…

Federal judge’s opinion in Stella Artois too-light beer case is plastered with alcohol references

A federal judge in Nevada has sent a case over underfilled beer glasses back to state court because its amount-in-controversy calculation is “mostly foam.”

Afternoon Briefs: These SCOTUS justices skipped the inauguration; student loan deferments extended

3 SCOTUS justices didn’t attend the inaugurations of Biden and Harris

The U.S. Supreme Court’s three oldest justices did not attend President Joe Biden’s inauguration Wednesday: Stephen G. Breyer, 82;…

Lawyer has filed nearly 100 consumer lawsuits over vanilla labeling

Long Island, New York, lawyer Spencer Sheehan wants consumers to know that they are sometimes being deceived by the "vanilla" label on the products that they buy.

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