ABA Journal

Consumer Law

1835 ABA Journal Consumer Law articles.

Suppliers of unwashed poppy seeds face suits over overdose deaths and injuries

Lawsuits are being filed around the country on behalf of people who brewed tea with unwashed poppy seeds in search of a home remedy for anxiety, arthritis or diarrhea.

Was your turkey raised by ‘independent family farmers’? Activists increasingly target food claims

An increasing number of class action lawsuits are being filed against the food and beverage industry as activists challenge corporate claims about their humane and sustainable practices.

5th Circuit rules for ‘The Hammer’ in lawyer’s trademark suit over purloined keywords and click-to-call ads

A Texas lawyer should get a chance to prove that consumers who entered his trademarked keywords in search engines were confused when they saw unlabeled advertisements, clicked on them, and found themselves calling a number that belonged to a legal referral group, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Judge scrutinizes BigLaw firm in ruling on evidence from blood-testing company Theranos that may be ‘irretrievably’ lost

The founder of blood-testing company Theranos can’t exclude government evidence at her fraud trial on the basis of lost, purportedly exculpatory evidence because her company was responsible for the destruction, a federal judge in San Jose, California, has ruled.

Zoom agrees to $85M settlement in litigation over privacy and ‘Zoombombings’

Zoom Video Communications has agreed to pay $85 million to settle nationwide litigation alleging misrepresentations and broken promises regarding customers’ security and privacy.

Chemerinsky: The SCOTUS sleeper cases of the October 2020 term

The U.S. Supreme Court’s October 2020 term, which ended on July 1, had major rulings that attracted media attention, such as its narrow interpretation of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and its ruling expanding the protections of the free exercise clause of the First Amendment. There also were some cases that attracted relatively little attention but that have the potential to have significant effects on the work of lawyers and judges throughout the country. Here are two of them.

Doctrine of laches, ‘speculative’ claim doom antitrust suits against Facebook; FTC gets second chance

In a pair of decisions Monday, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., tossed antitrust lawsuits filed against Facebook by the Federal Trade Commission and the vast majority of state attorneys general.

Thomas, liberal justices dissent in SCOTUS standing decision: ‘Pithy catchphrase’ limits Congress’ power

In a 5-4 decision on constitutional standing, the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday limited which consumers can sue over erroneous TransUnion credit reports that flagged them as potential terrorists, drug traffickers and other serious criminals.

Consumer suit alleges ‘Hint of Lime’ packaging overstates the fruit amount in Tostitos chips

A federal lawsuit filed last month against Frito-Lay North America Inc. has alleged that the maker of the corn chips, potato chips and other snack foods misleads consumers by touting a “Hint of Lime” in Tostitos chips that apparently contain only a “negligible amount of lime.”

Amazon drops arbitration requirement after facing over 75,000 demands

Many companies require their employees and customers to resolve disputes through arbitration rather than in the courtroom. Now, Amazon is no longer one of them.

California often leads the way in passing environmental and consumer protection laws

A slew of measures passed in California in recent years in hopes of expanding consumer or environmental protections further afield. Whether it’s product ingredients or data privacy or pollution prevention, California is frequently where such laws start.

Afternoon Briefs: Judge denies QAnon connection; investors sue over ‘Voltswagen’ prank press release

Pennsylvania judge denies any QAnon connection

A Philadelphia judge running for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is denying any connection to QAnon and its conspiracy theories. Judge Paula Patrick told the…

Ruling in payday loan case, Supreme Court curbs ability of FTC to obtain restitution

The Federal Trade Commission will have to follow a more cumbersome procedure to obtain restitution or disgorgement as a result of a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruling Thursday.

Departing lawyers who copied firm’s databases may be liable for unfair business practices, top state court says

Departing lawyers who downloaded a “treasure trove” of proprietary materials from their Boston law firm may be liable for unfair or deceptive business practices, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has ruled.

Afternoon Briefs: ACLU wants lawyer’s libel lawsuit tossed; Dershowitz gives limited advice in MyPillow CEO suit

ACLU seeks dismissal of lawyer’s libel suit

The Georgia Supreme Court has agreed to consider whether a lawyer’s libel lawsuit against the American Civil Liberties Union may go to trial.…

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