ABA Journal

Court Administration

202 ABA Journal Court Administration articles.

Confederate symbols should be removed from courthouses, ABA House says

Confederate memorabilia “and other symbols of racial and ethnic bias” should be removed from facilities where court proceedings are held, according to a resolution passed Monday by the ABA House of Delegates.

SCOTUS justices were questioned but not implicated in Dobbs leak probe; some are concerned about double standard

Investigators questioned U.S. Supreme Court justices as they probed the leak of a draft opinion overturning the right to abortion, but the justices were not required to sign affidavits, the official who oversaw the probe said Friday.

Who leaked Dobbs? SCOTUS investigators don’t know, despite 97 employee interviews and forensic sleuthing

The U.S. Supreme Court can’t identify who leaked Justice Samuel Alito’s draft opinion overturning the right to abortion to Politico in May 2022, according to a report released Thursday.

Judge ruled on traffic citations before hearing date to cover for planned absence, ethics complaint alleges

A municipal judge in Philadelphia is accused of trying to cover for her upcoming absence by ruling on traffic citations before the scheduled hearing date, marking some ticketed people as “guilty in absentia.”

Congress passes bills to protect judges, remove statue of Dred Scott decision author

ABA President Deborah Enix-Ross is applauding Congress for passing a bill intended to keep federal judges safe by banning disclosure of their personal information.

Many federal judges want clerkship diversity but say the topic is rarely addressed in court, new study says

In a recent study of federal appellate judges, many indicated that they had difficulties hiring Black law clerks. Black jurists, who make up less than one-eighth of the federal appellate courts, hired more than half of the Black clerks.

Lawyer and co-defendant behind robocalls with false ballot information are ordered to register voters

An Ohio judge has ordered a lawyer and a co-defendant to register voters in Washington, D.C., for sending robocalls with false information about mail-in ballots to minority neighborhoods in Cleveland before the 2020 presidential election.

Georgetown Law launches fellowship program to improve public access to courts through technology

The Georgetown University Law Center plans to embed technology experts in state, local and tribal courts in September 2023 through a fellowship program intended to help improve court processes and public access to justice.

Lawyers struggle to make headway with growing immigrant backlog

The virtual courtroom of immigration Judge Thomas Mulligan of New York City’s Varick Street court was not exactly a well-oiled machine on a recent August morning. The judge was occupied with master calendar hearings, the docket where respondents—they would be called “defendants” in other settings—acknowledged and answered the government’s charges.

Lawyer’s testimony about client’s threat to ‘bust a cap’ in prosecutor warrants reversal, appeals court says

A trial court erred when it allowed a lawyer to testify about a client’s alleged threats against a prosecutor during two private conversations in the courthouse hallway, the District of Columbia Court of Appeals has ruled.

Court reporter is ordered to meet deadline or go to jail, with her equipment, until work is done

A court reporter in Texas who blamed her missed deadlines on a Holland & Knight lawyer’s “constant calling” at least twice per day faces a new deadline with consequences.

Past PACER users would each get at least $350 in refunds under lawsuit settlement

The U.S. government has agreed to pay $125 million to settle a class action lawsuit claiming that the judiciary overcharged users of PACER, its electronic system of court records.

Suspended judge is accused of trying to stop report that he walked around courthouse in underwear

A Kentucky judge who was temporarily suspended after he was accused of misconduct in connection with an ankle-monitoring program is facing new ethics charges.

Law firms, courts deal with aftermath of Hurricane Ian

Law firms and courthouses are dealing with Hurricane Ian and its aftermath.

Trump doesn’t have to detail claims about planted documents to special master, judge says

There is no need for former President Donald Trump to raise objections to the government’s inventory of documents seized from his Mar-a-Lago home in Palm Beach, Florida—at least at this stage of his lawsuit, a federal judge ruled Thursday.

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