ABA Journal

Court Administration

122 ABA Journal Court Administration articles.

Judges are stressed by their decisions, and 20% have at least one depressive symptom, survey finds

One in five judges who responded to a survey on job stress met at least one criteria for depressive disorder, according to survey results released late last month.

Chemerinsky: Predicting the Supreme Court in 2021 may be dangerous and futile

At the end of 2019, law dean Erwin Chemerinsky attempted to look ahead to what to expect in the U.S. Supreme Court in 2020. He’s sure 2021 will be no different in its unpredictability. Here are some things to look for at the high court in the year ahead.

Second half of SCOTUS term may bring the temperature down compared to its feverish first

The U.S. Supreme Court justices may soon be able to settle in for some relative peace and quiet in the second half of their term. Decisions in several high-profile merits cases are being drafted and circulated.

Afternoon Briefs: Dentons merges with another firm; dad can’t be banned from procreating, court rules

Dentons will combine with Alabama law firm

Dentons has announced that it will combine with Sirote & Permutt, an Alabama law firm with 86 lawyers and offices in five locations.…

Judge nixes courtroom portraits mostly portraying white judges before Black defendant’s trial

A judge in Fairfax, Virginia, has agreed to a Black defendant’s request to remove courtroom portraits that mostly portray white judges before his trial Jan. 4.

Top 5 Your Voice columns of 2020

From what law students can learn from the musical Hamilton to tips on marketing your practice during the pandemic, the ABA Journal’s Your Voice section hosted a number of fascinating columns in 2020.

State supreme court calls prosecutor’s courthouse campaigning an ‘exploitation of the judicial system’

The Arkansas Supreme Court overturned a man's murder conviction Thursday after finding that the prosecutor improperly campaigned in the courthouse during the trial.

Pardon me? A look at the broad, yet somewhat-murky clemency powers of a president

Presidents have long used the pardon power in ways that have resulted in outrage and controversy. One of the broadest, yet least-understood clauses in the U.S. Constitution, the pardon power has been the subject of renewed focus and attention, thanks to the parlor game of what President Donald Trump can or cannot do with regards to granting clemency.

Afternoon Briefs: 10 states file antitrust suit against Google; SCOTUS sides with churches

Antitrust suit targets Google as ad middleman

Texas and nine other states have filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google that contends that the search engine company suppressed competition in…

Judge accused of failing to follow COVID-19 recommendations is removed from 2 trials

An Ohio judge has been removed from two upcoming criminal trials after a lawyer for the defendants alleged that the judge was failing to implement COVID-19 precautions.

Texas judicial conduct system and Washington bar association grapple with cyberattacks

Cyberattacks affected the work of the Texas Commission on Judicial Conduct and a website of the the Washington State Bar Association, according to two recent news stories.

Does CBS series ‘All Rise’ realistically portray the pandemic-plagued legal system?

“Every time I walk into a crowded area with a large number of masked individuals, I have to remind myself this isn’t some Orwellian dimension; this is reality,” writes Oklahoma lawyer Adam Banner.

Afternoon Briefs: Suits accuse Facebook of ‘buy or bury’ approach; House bill makes PACER records free

State and FTC lawsuits accuse Facebook of stifling competition

Facebook is accused of stifling competition in two lawsuits filed Wednesday. One suit was filed by the Federal Trade Commission, and…

ABA commission receives national recognition for work with homeless courts

The ABA Commission on Homelessness and Poverty was honored Monday by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness for its role in providing guidance, training and technical assistance to homeless courts across the country.

Trump administration officials appear to defy court orders, setting a bad precedent, prof says

Judges seem unprepared from the defiance of Trump administration officials who appear to have repeatedly defied court orders, according to a political science professor who researches judicial decision-making.

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