Court Security

570 ABA Journal Court Security articles.

Federal judiciary seeks 79 new judgeships, money to improve courthouse security
The Judicial Conference of the United States on Tuesday recommended that Congress create 79 new judgeships, including two on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at San Francisco.
A COVID-19 year in review: Courts, juries and technology
Happy anniversary. It’s been about one year now since the world was introduced to the coronavirus pandemic. What else can we say? This is as good a time as any to reflect on the changes to the world, especially to the world of law.
Does A&E’s ‘Court Cam’ accurately reflect American courtrooms?
I like to start the new year by cleaning out my life, more or less. It’s kind of a ritual for me. I take time to send out file destruction letters to clients whose cases were closed out more than five years ago and permanently delete client communications from my email inbox that are just as old (five years is the rule in Oklahoma). Generally, I try to give myself a bit of a fresh start.
6 tips from infectious disease experts for in-person court proceedings

As the pandemic began to rage across America last spring, U.S. District of Maryland Chief Judge James K. Bredar puzzled over how to mount in-person hearings. The judge quickly realized he needed the help of a public health expert. He turned to epidemiologist Dr. Jonathan M. Zenilman.

Afternoon Briefs: Gunman had file on SCOTUS justice, judge says; state AG charged in fatal crash

Gunman apparently targeted this SCOTUS justice, judge says

Lawyer Roy Den Hollander, the gunman who killed the son of U.S. District Judge Esther Salas of the District…

Former administrative law judge is censured for punching a lawyer outside a party
A former administrative law judge in New York has been censured for punching a legal aid lawyer outside a Manhattan party in October 2016.
Afternoon Briefs: Appeals court vacates ‘dirty power’ rule; court employee accused of online threats

DC Circuit Court vacates ‘dirty power’ rule

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit effectively ended the Trump administration’s plan to weaken climate change policies Tuesday…

Lawyer shocked with stun gun at courthouse cites racial bias, says he will appeal conviction
A California lawyer who wore casual clothes when he stopped by the courthouse on his day off has said he could have acted differently when confronted by deputies, but he did not commit a crime.
Courts discuss security after warning of potential protest threats
Courts across the country are discussing security after a news report said pro-Trump groups were considering storming courthouses.
Federal court documents and DOJ emails compromised in cybersecurity breach
The federal courts and the U.S. Department of Justice have announced that they were apparently affected by a hack of widely used network management software known as SolarWinds.
Texas judicial conduct system and Washington bar association grapple with cyberattacks
Cyberattacks affected the work of the Texas Commission on Judicial Conduct and a website of the the Washington State Bar Association, according to two recent news stories.
Afternoon Briefs: Suits accuse Facebook of ‘buy or bury’ approach; House bill makes PACER records free

State and FTC lawsuits accuse Facebook of stifling competition

Facebook is accused of stifling competition in two lawsuits filed Wednesday. One suit was filed by the Federal Trade Commission, and…

Kids in divorce court: Understanding the impact and how legal professionals can help

Aside from doing everything in their power to keep kids out of the courtroom, we can hear teenage voices and work toward giving them some of what they want without giving them everything they want.

Afternoon Briefs: Former Trump adviser sues over FBI surveillance; ex-lawyer sentenced in Ponzi scheme

Former Trump campaign adviser sues over FBI surveillance

Former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page has filed a $75 million lawsuit against the FBI and the U.S. Department of Justice for…

Survey finds sexual harassment still a problem in New York courts, and lawyers are worst offenders
A majority of female lawyers responding to a survey by a New York judicial committee reported inappropriate or demeaning conduct by other attorneys.

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