ABA Journal

Criminal Justice

19939 ABA Journal Criminal Justice articles.

Forfeiture of convicted drug dealer’s Land Rover was an excessive fine, state supreme court rules

The Indiana Supreme Court has ruled that a convicted drug dealer who challenged the forfeiture of his Land Rover before the U.S. Supreme Court should get his vehicle back.

Longtime lawyer is investigated in shooting outside his law office; ‘a number of attorneys’ carry guns

A Connecticut real estate lawyer is under police investigation following a fatal shooting Monday evening in the parking lot outside his law firm's office in Litchfield, Connecticut.

In closing brief, disbarred environmental lawyer claims his prosecution is ‘run by an oil company’

A closing brief filed on behalf of disbarred environmental lawyer Steven Donziger contends that the criminal contempt case against him “has all the trappings of a deeply troubled and conflicted prosecution run by an oil company.”

Afternoon Briefs: An unusual SCOTUS lineup; suit says Google is a public utility

SCOTUS rules for defendant in career criminal case

Two conservative justices supported liberal U.S. Supreme Court justices Thursday to rule that a crime of recklessness is not a “violent felony”…

HBO’s ‘The Scheme’ looks at corruption and college sports

I was an athlete when I was younger, playing baseball and football all through school. Even now, I still love the mental and emotional clarity physical activity brings. More than that, though, sports allow me to set aside time to share a common bond with the ones near my heart but distant in location. I cherish the group FaceTime calls with my pops and cousins (who live in Texas) as we complain about the Dallas Cowboys on a beautiful fall afternoon, for example.

Woman who led police on low-speed chase on her mobility scooter wins reversal of her conviction

A woman who led police on a low-speed chase on her electric mobility scooter wasn’t operating a motor vehicle and should not have been convicted for fleeing or attempting to elude a police officer, an Oregon appeals court has ruled.

‘Vice Patrol’ examines how police and courts enforced anti-gay laws before Stonewall

In Vice Patrol: Cops, Courts, and the Struggle Over Urban Gay Life Before Stonewall, author Anna Lvovsky examines the way that queer communities were policed in the 1930s through the 1960s.

Judge is suspended for rude treatment of public defenders; he will also have to hire a counselor or life coach

The Arkansas Supreme Court has suspended a judge and ordered him to hire a counselor or a life coach for rude and intimidating treatment of public defenders in the courtroom. Judge Barry Sims, a circuit judge in Arkansas, will be suspended for 30 days.

Judge who appeared determined to avoid mandatory sentence is removed from case

A judge who appeared determined to impose a reduced sentence on a woman who cooperated in a sexual exploitation prosecution has been removed from the case.

District attorney backtracks after refusing to offer plea deals to lawyer who said prosecution office is racist

A Pennsylvania district attorney has reversed course after he directed his office to stop offering plea deals to clients of a Black attorney who claimed that the district attorney’s office was “systematically racist.”

SCOTUS will hear case involving FBI surveillance of Muslim community and state secrets privilege

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to consider the government’s ability to invoke the state secrets privilege to defeat a lawsuit accusing the FBI of illegally spying on the Muslim community.

Arizona reportedly prepares gas chamber for execution by cyanide, the gas used at Auschwitz

Arizona officials have “gone to considerable lengths to revive the state’s mothballed gas chamber,” according to a recently released report by the Guardian.

Afternoon Briefs: Legal industry jobs jump again; Boies Schiller emails admissible at former CEO’s trial

Legal industry gains 1,700 jobs in May

The legal services industry gained 1,700 jobs in May, according to seasonally adjusted numbers released Friday by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The…

In New York, a 7-year-old is arrested for rape; should the age for juvenile prosecutions be raised?

Children in New York can be charged as juvenile delinquents beginning at age 7, which explains why a boy of that age could be charged with rape in March in upstate Brasher Falls, New York.

Justice Barrett parts ways with 3 conservative justices in ruling on reach of computer fraud law

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act doesn’t apply to a police officer’s search of a license plate database for an acquaintance who paid him more than $5,000.

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