Diversity

634 ABA Journal Diversity articles.

DOJ suit accuses Yale of discriminating against Asian and white applicants
The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a lawsuit accusing Yale University of racially discriminating against many Asian and white applicants by considering race at multiple stages of its admissions process and racially balancing its classes.
‘On the Basis of Sex’ and remembering Justice Ginsburg
R.I.P., RBG. Here we are again, almost four years from the last time a U.S. Supreme Court Justice died in office. Justice Antonin Scalia passed away in February of 2016, and President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland for the vacant position. We all know how that turned out.
Afternoon Briefs: Property law scholar wins ‘genius grant;’ judge says inmates entitled to stimulus checks

Law prof who studied Black land ownership wins ‘genius grant’

Thomas Wilson Mitchell, a law professor at the Texas A&M University, is the only lawyer among 21 winners of the…

BigLaw firm resolves pay bias claim over bonuses paid at predecessor firm
Locke Lord has agreed to pay $150,000 to resolve allegations that a predecessor law firm discriminated against 22 female associates by paying them lower bonuses than their male colleagues.
Amy Coney Barrett signed 2006 ad calling for end to ‘barbaric legacy of Roe v. Wade’
U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett is under fire after disclosure of a 2006 ad she signed opposing “abortion on demand” and calling for an end to “the barbaric legacy of Roe v. Wade.”
The psychological obstacles to achieving diversity in the legal profession
Last year, I wrote that the legal profession’s failure to retain women and minorities was not a “hard problem,” but rather a character flaw. My intent was not to imply malice; many partners at law firms genuinely want their diversity numbers to improve. Still, facts are facts.
Recent equal pay lawsuits by female law professors has shined a light on academic compensation process

“People who violate the norms get punished. Whether that is demanding equal pay, demanding to get the same quality of work as a nonminority or demanding to be spoken to with dignity, norm violators get punished. And for too long, women were expected to sit down, be quiet and follow the lead of men,” says Fitzgerald Bramwell, a Chicago litigator.

Female lawyers face unique challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic

Female lawyers face unique work-from-home issues, compounding well-documented attrition and promotion challenges. Virtual work makes it harder to establish relationships with mentors and sponsors, and fractionalization can happen.

The power of my hearing loss

To many, it may seem ironic that a deaf judge presides over hearings. Although I navigate the world as a South Asian Muslim woman with hearing loss, seeing my disability as my power is what shaped my path to law.

After nearly a decade in the MMA industry, this general counsel now keeps NASCAR on track

Not many lawyers can say they’ve worked with the late U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings, with cage fighters nicknamed The American Psycho, Cyborg and Rampage, and with the first family of stock car racing. But not many lawyers have a career like Tracey Lesetar-Smith’s.

How do you make your workplace culture into one that will be embraced?

Winning cases and helping clients is crucial to a profitable law firm. But there’s another piece of the puzzle that’s often neglected: company culture.

NAPABA president Bonnie Lee Wolf’s efforts against anti-Asian discrimination draw support of ABA, other groups

“What’s encouraging is that it seems like people are listening, and we can be part of that driving force to see real action and real change,” Wolf says.

Afternoon Briefs: Barrett’s net worth, Trump’s quick decision revealed; Satanic Temple sues

Trump offered SCOTUS nomination to Barrett the same day he met with her

President Donald Trump offered the U.S. Supreme Court nomination to Judge Amy Coney Barrett on Sept. 21,…

First Black Oregon Supreme Court justice blazes a trail for lawyers—and students

On a hot day in June 2019, Oregon Supreme Court Justice Adrienne Nelson stood up and made a promise to her community. “This is going to be a place where students know they are enough, and they can build from that and grow from that,” she said.

Barrett’s expansive view of Second Amendment could provide fifth vote to strike down gun laws
U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett has written just one Second Amendment opinion—a dissent—but the analysis shows that she is likely to go further to protect gun rights than her mentor, the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

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